Anybody ever learn to play a 11 string guitar?

2busy

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Picked a 5 string banjo for a little while till I messed up my tendon in my arm. Went to clawhammer style after that. But haven't picked a banjo up in years.
 

old John

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I've tried to learn but it wasn't happening. I bought my wife her first guitar a few years ago and she's getting pretty good. She hasn't tried a twelve sting yet and may never, but I hand it to her because even mastering six strings, in my book, is quite an accomplishment. That said, here's a 10 year old kid to give a listen to. If you haven't heard of him I'm sure you will since he's already shared the stage with Carlos Santana to name just one.


A 12 string guitar is just a 6 string guitar, with double sets of strings! 2-E strings together, 2-B strings together, etc. it plays exactly like a 6 string guitar, just harder to tune, and the sound is somewhat different! They also require a stronger built body, and neck because of the added tension exerted by all those strings!
 

chuter

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There are only 8 notes possible on any instrument, no matter how many strings you put on it! This looks complicated but if you watch this guy he is only playing the bottom strings, in the first part, then he moves up and plays the very same notes in a lower octave!
There are 8 notes in a standard scale, but 13 in a chromatic scale, increasing by half steps.
I believe in Indian (Asian Indian) music they might even use quarter steps.

It looked like he didn't touch the top 4 or 5 strings; they might be there just to resonate with certain tones, I've seen other guitars like that, but not one like his.
1641586775813.png
 

ttown

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That’s about 9 strings to many for me 🎸

Always wanted to play and learn different languages……. That 🚢 ship has sailed.⚓
My new dream stay retired and thank god I’m in a state like Oklahoma.🌅
 

old John

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There are 8 notes in a standard scale, but 13 in a chromatic scale, increasing by half steps.
I believe in Indian (Asian Indian) music they might even use quarter steps.

It looked like he didn't touch the top 4 or 5 strings; they might be there just to resonate with certain tones, I've seen other guitars like that, but not one like his.
View attachment 244558
8 notes and all the minors, sharps, flats, augmented, 7th, etc. are just variations of the basic 8 major notes. Just making something that is, simple look complicated? This contraption pictured here looks like it would kill the sound with all that stress on the top, preventing it from moving! In an acustic instrument the top, and back, vibrate from the sound made by the strings, this acts like a bellows to amplify, and enrich, the sound quality! Different tone woods produce different sounds, In quality guitars most tops are made of spruce, the two top types of spruce for guitar tops are East Indian, and Adirondack Spruce. the backs, and sides, are usually made of rose wood, or mahogany, quality tone wood is harvisted from mountainous areas, and from the NORTH SLOPE! Trees grown on the north side has tighter, straghter grain because it gets less sun light, and this makes it grow slower, and produces a tighter, striagher grain, ( tree rings)! Mahogany produces a more mellow sound, while rose wood produces a louder booming sound! The same verity of tone wood grown in different geographic areas produces vastly different tones, and sounds. Brazilian Rose Wood, is an endangered species, and can't legally be harvested, and used in instruments now, only Brazilian Rose Wood that was harvested before this law was in force can legially be used in instruments, which makes old Brazilian Rose wood guitars extremely valuable! This is a complicated subject, and fascinating! Some expererts think Stradivarius was able to make the HOLY GRAIL violins, because the tone wood he used was grown during the so-called little ice age, and that these weather conditions produced this remarkable tone, and sounds, in the tone wood used?
 

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Nope. I did try my hand at a guitar many years ago though. I traded for a Gretch hollow body and a Peavey amp setup. I used to turn it up and rattle the windows, just to drown out the fact that I couldn't play a note. My wife swore it gave her nosebleeds, so I ended up trading it all off for some gun stuff.
 

dennishoddy

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I've tried to learn but it wasn't happening. I bought my wife her first guitar a few years ago and she's getting pretty good. She hasn't tried a twelve sting yet and may never, but I hand it to her because even mastering six strings, in my book, is quite an accomplishment. That said, here's a 10 year old kid to give a listen to. If you haven't heard of him I'm sure you will since he's already shared the stage with Carlos Santana to name just one.
That kid has quite the talent. Part of playing solo guitar like he is doing involves some showmanship with the grimace or an expression of how difficult the riff was by facial expression.
I prefer a smile afterward to signify completing the riff successfully vs the grimace performed during. These young up and comers haven't perfected it yet relying on the grimace way too often IMHO.
 

Aries

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That kid has quite the talent. Part of playing solo guitar like he is doing involves some showmanship with the grimace or an expression of how difficult the riff was by facial expression.
I prefer a smile afterward to signify completing the riff successfully vs the grimace performed during. These young up and comers haven't perfected it yet relying on the grimace way too often IMHO.
Have you ever paid attention to Joe Walsh's face while he's playing? That guy is hysterical.... :rollingla
 

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