Cheap electric heater tweaking

Rod Snell

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Aug 10, 2006
Messages
2,518
Reaction score
305
Location
Altus
For those quoting the DC version version of Ohm's law, they cannot be used in AC circuits because AC goes off and on in a sine wave
pattern. Here are the correct equations for AC circuits: https://mil.ufl.edu/3111/docs/AC_Power_Eqns_Zmuda.pdf

US house wiring is usually single phase 220V (nominal) with a neutral (white) wire that allows 110V circuits between one leg of the 220 and the neutral.
Thus a circuit between the two legs of the 220V will produce twice the power of the 110V circuit, IF BOTH HAVE THE SAME AMPERES OF CURRENT!
The electric meter only records the CURRENT, so the 220V circuit delivers twice the power for the same cost, just considering this example in isolation.

Ideally, the 110V circuits in a house are obtained equally from each leg of the 220 and neutral, so the net current being bled to ground is minimized, and you are actually using the power you are paying for. For example, if you put 110V heaters on circuits made from opposite legs of the 220 to neutral, the current would flow into the house on one leg, through one heater to neutral, then through neutral through the other heater, then out the other leg, with a net loss to ground of zero. This specific case would allow the two 110V heaters to be as efficient as 220.
Unfortunately, most homeowners have no idea which leg of the 220 is used for each of the 110V circuits, and don't know where to start to balance 110V circuits between the two legs of the 220. High-current circuits in your house (30A and up) are 220V to avoid bleeding current to ground.

I had a house in Maryland, built in the '40s, that had ALL the 110V circuits on one leg of the 220, and a HIGH elec bill. I rewired it to current standards, and cut the electricity bill nearly in half.
 
Last edited:

Forgalspop

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
375
Reaction score
853
Location
Guthrie, OK

Transmission and Power Loss​

The rated voltage input in each cable the power company feeds to a service panel is 120 volts plus or minus five percent due to fluctuations in transmission loss in the power lines. This means that the power at the panel can be as low as 114 volts. As the electricity encounters resistance in conductors and does work while passing through electrical devices along its path, its voltage drops still lower. In a house with extensive circuitry, it is not unusual to get a 110 volt reading or less at receptacles far from the panel.
We are on CREC rural electric and I have checked the voltage at our outlets many times when replacing receptacles, etc with a multi-meter and they consistently run 123 volts. CREC recently installed a new net metering meter for our solar system and I have checked the output from the solar system and at night to see what different appliances, etc. are using and the meter reads constantly 246 volts when drawing power exclusively from the grid and 247 volts when being powered by the solar system. The new meter displays voltage and kilowatts being produced, etc. I'm sure there are times it fluctuates when I'm not checking, but over all our power from CREC is consistent. It might not be the same with other electric companies.

We have been with CREC for 35 years and they have done a great job in restoring power quickly when there has been outages. I would think that OG&E might have more difficulties in consistent transmission, etc. They service a much large area and many more customers. So I would think that line voltage consistency could be dependent on many factors, such as how large the grid an electric company is servicing and the age of the transmission lines and equipment.
 

MacFromOK

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
May 11, 2016
Messages
13,194
Reaction score
13,536
Location
Southern Oklahoma
We are on CREC rural electric and I have checked the voltage at our outlets many times when replacing receptacles, etc with a multi-meter and they consistently run 123 volts. CREC recently installed a new net metering meter for our solar system and I have checked the output from the solar system and at night to see what different appliances, etc. are using and the meter reads constantly 246 volts when drawing power exclusively from the grid and 247 volts when being powered by the solar system. The new meter displays voltage and kilowatts being produced, etc. I'm sure there are times it fluctuates when I'm not checking, but over all our power from CREC is consistent. It might not be the same with other electric companies.

We have been with CREC for 35 years and they have done a great job in restoring power quickly when there has been outages. I would think that OG&E might have more difficulties in consistent transmission, etc. They service a much large area and many more customers. So I would think that line voltage consistency could be dependent on many factors, such as how large the grid an electric company is servicing and the age of the transmission lines and equipment.
Sounds much like our experience with Red River Valley coop. The higher voltage may be due to the fact that pretty much every residence has its own transformer.

In the approx 45 years we've lived here, we've never been without power 24hrs (IIRC about 12hrs was the max).
:drunk2:
___
 

Forgalspop

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
375
Reaction score
853
Location
Guthrie, OK
Yesterday I posted that I had ordered 2 ceramic heaters made by Lasko and that their products were made in the USA. Well..........................some of their products might be made in the USA, but not the 2 ceramic heaters that arrived today. They are made in China. On top of that one was dead on arrival. Just got off the phone with an Amazon rep located in Jamaica and will be returning the defective unit. I will be searching out a different brand. Doesn't speak well for their quality control.

The positive was the rep from Jamaica and I had a fun conversation. He was a blast to speak with. We spent 20 or 30 minutes talking about various subjects besides the return issue. He was a riot. Had a great sense of humor. Kind of made my day.

Anyhow, when one does an internet search about products made in the USA and companies that manufacture in the USA.............................it may or may not be true!
 

Forgalspop

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
375
Reaction score
853
Location
Guthrie, OK
Sounds much like our experience with Red River Valley coop. The higher voltage may be due to the fact that pretty much every residence has its own transformer.

In the approx 45 years we've lived here, we've never been without power 24hrs (IIRC about 12hrs was the max).
:drunk2:
___
There is a transformer at the edge of my property that supplies our house and the neighbors. There are multiple transformers throughout the neighborhood of 20 houses, some for one house or a couple houses. I had not thought of that, but you are spot on.
 

Forgalspop

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Messages
375
Reaction score
853
Location
Guthrie, OK
Yesterday I posted that I had ordered 2 ceramic heaters made by Lasko and that their products were made in the USA. Well..........................some of their products might be made in the USA, but not the 2 ceramic heaters that arrived today. They are made in China. On top of that one was dead on arrival. Just got off the phone with an Amazon rep located in Jamaica and will be returning the defective unit. I will be searching out a different brand. Doesn't speak well for their quality control.

The positive was the rep from Jamaica and I had a fun conversation. He was a blast to speak with. We spent 20 or 30 minutes talking about various subjects besides the return issue. He was a riot. Had a great sense of humor. Kind of made my day.

Anyhow, when one does an internet search about products made in the USA and companies that manufacture in the USA.............................it may or may not be true!
Follow up. When going to Amazon's website and typing in Space Heaters made in the USA. The ones I ordered come up as made in the USA. Can't believe Amazon's info either. They are made in China.
 

grady31

Marksman
Special Hen
Joined
Nov 5, 2015
Messages
10
Reaction score
4
Location
Tuttle
Deviation, but anyone see outdoor wood fired boiler? Circulates hot water back into the house to heat by radiant or forced air. I had never seen one but saw an ad in a magazine and got me to looking. It wouldn't be that great for me anyway since I'd probably spend more on wood than gas. But pretty cool concept.
Cool Concept if you have all the time in the world to keep it stoked . Forget about it or if you are gone for a few days on those cold windy days ..... you end up with a cold house and frozen water .
 
Top Bottom