Communications ...***

p238shooter

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Aug 16, 2012
Messages
3,233
Reaction score
1,945
Location
East of Tulsa

p238shooter,​

Is the license/permit I got back in 1974 or 1975, that was a license required to set up a “base” station and communicate on a 24 channel “cb” radio, the same license/credentials that is needed to communicate on or use a ham radio?
KAJB1674 is or was the identifier I was given.
Ha, I think I was KTE9451 if I remember correctly from somewhere around 1972 or so. Totally useless to have that kind of license requirement.
Sorry, Ham Radio is a whole different deal requiring you do some real studying and take a real test to show you have learned about what you are legal to do, frequencies and modes you are allowed to talk on, and to pass the test you will know quite a bit of how radio, voice and digital modes work. We are a structured group of real radio operators who follow the rules and regulations throwing out our real call signs which are readily identifiable of who and where we are. There are three classes of licenses which give you different frequency ranges (bands) to talk on. The first Technician level is typically going to give you up to a 50-70 mile range with a standard 50W radio. The second General level will give you some nation wide and worldwide frequencies, while the Extra class license with give you additional ham band frequencies.

Where a 23 channel CB radio had 23 frequencies in one 11meter band, ham radio has thousands of frequencies in many different band ranges, not just 11 meter. CB is legal up to 5W power. Many of the frequencies we have can be used to talk world wide on a standard 100W radio. I have a 1500W amp sitting on my desk to legally use if needed to talk where I desire around the world with my Extra class license, so yes there is a lot of differnces.

Back to getting the first level Technition license. There are over 300 possible questions, (many similar but worded differently) and you have to make at least 70% on a 35 question test to pass. Testing sessions are $15, but expected to have a price hike in a few months. Local ham radio clubs can direct you to places and times for test sessions. I do suggest you look up and visit local ham radio clubs in your area. You will find they will welcome you as a visitor and be happy to help as much as they can.

The ARRL.org website has a lot of information posted to get you started with information and the requirements about the three levels of licenses. There are many free test practice sites out on the web if you are good at memorizing answers. Personally I am not, I have to understand the "why" to learn most anything. I have had great success over the past 20 years sending people to a $25 pay site hamtestonline.com that the 40-50 people I know have used his program have all passed on their first try and all were very knowledgeable of ham radio when they got finished with his course. We had a 9 yo girl only miss one question on her exam a while back using this program. This site has all the materials you need in one place with no need to purchase any books or anything else to study and actually learn the answers to each question you may be given and why that answer is correct. An hour or so most every night for a couple weeks or so should get you there, but that may vary depending on time you have avilable. If you have to take a break studying, when you go back in it is right where you left off. He gives you a little free trial before you pay to see how it might work for you and gives you 6 mo access to pass your test. It works.

Let me know if you have any questions I might be able to help you with.
 

GeneW

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Jan 20, 2013
Messages
630
Reaction score
703
Location
OKC
I'm like most started off with cb in the 70's. I have a Kenwood 600 receiver and a couple of the Baofengs. I've been trying to find out more about the Gmrs radios and about the repeaters. I have yet to find anyone in the Wichita Ks area that has any knowledge about it here. closest repeater is in Manhattan Ks or Bartlesville Ok. The fee for a 10 year licence is $70 1st of the year will drop to $35.00.
Go to the Radio Shack in Derby, see Mark. Mark is a ham, sells a lot of equipment, and an all around good guy.
 

GeneW

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Jan 20, 2013
Messages
630
Reaction score
703
Location
OKC
Yes you can, by law, in an EMERGENCY use an amateur radio to communicate.

However, you most likely will not be able to. You don't know how.

You are not familiar with the radio, any antenna switches, type of antenna, power supply, etc. You won't be able to know when to use an available band, and frequency, or how to get to it.

All radios, typically, are able to tune in to pretty much any frequency (within reason) and listen, but the radio is NOT able to transmit out of the legal band range. Factory set, and for good reason. I'm saying you might have the radio set to a frequency that will not allow you to transmit at all, and you have no no idea of this.

The bands are different, mostly, in their useability. Some bands only work at night, some only work during the day. Some bands are for very short range, some pretty much long long distance.

There are other factors, but that's a short way of telling you, you can't just walk up to a radio and system and start talking. You have to know what you're doing, and the only way to get to that point is take the test, pass, and get a license.

Things just won't work unless you know how to do so.

An old retired, now deceased, attorney and friend was fond of saying "Nothing beats knowing what you're doing. Nothing." And of course, he was right then, and will always be right.
 

JeffT

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2010
Messages
576
Reaction score
296
Location
Piedmont
Ha, I think I was KTE9451 if I remember correctly from somewhere around 1972 or so. Totally useless to have that kind of license requirement.
Sorry, Ham Radio is a whole different deal requiring you do some real studying and take a real test to show you have learned about what you are legal to do, frequencies and modes you are allowed to talk on, and to pass the test you will know quite a bit of how radio, voice and digital modes work. We are a structured group of real radio operators who follow the rules and regulations throwing out our real call signs which are readily identifiable of who and where we are. There are three classes of licenses which give you different frequency ranges (bands) to talk on. The first Technician level is typically going to give you up to a 50-70 mile range with a standard 50W radio. The second General level will give you some nation wide and worldwide frequencies, while the Extra class license with give you additional ham band frequencies.

Where a 23 channel CB radio had 23 frequencies in one 11meter band, ham radio has thousands of frequencies in many different band ranges, not just 11 meter. CB is legal up to 5W power. Many of the frequencies we have can be used to talk world wide on a standard 100W radio. I have a 1500W amp sitting on my desk to legally use if needed to talk where I desire around the world with my Extra class license, so yes there is a lot of differnces.

Back to getting the first level Technition license. There are over 300 possible questions, (many similar but worded differently) and you have to make at least 70% on a 35 question test to pass. Testing sessions are $15, but expected to have a price hike in a few months. Local ham radio clubs can direct you to places and times for test sessions. I do suggest you look up and visit local ham radio clubs in your area. You will find they will welcome you as a visitor and be happy to help as much as they can.

The ARRL.org website has a lot of information posted to get you started with information and the requirements about the three levels of licenses. There are many free test practice sites out on the web if you are good at memorizing answers. Personally I am not, I have to understand the "why" to learn most anything. I have had great success over the past 20 years sending people to a $25 pay site hamtestonline.com that the 40-50 people I know have used his program have all passed on their first try and all were very knowledgeable of ham radio when they got finished with his course. We had a 9 yo girl only miss one question on her exam a while back using this program. This site has all the materials you need in one place with no need to purchase any books or anything else to study and actually learn the answers to each question you may be given and why that answer is correct. An hour or so most every night for a couple weeks or so should get you there, but that may vary depending on time you have avilable. If you have to take a break studying, when you go back in it is right where you left off. He gives you a little free trial before you pay to see how it might work for you and gives you 6 mo access to pass your test. It works.

Let me know if you have any questions I might be able to help you with.

P238Shooter,
Thank You!
I have always been interested in radio communication. Now that I have a little more time and funds to devote to it, I will have to look for a local HAM group to talk to about getting serious about it! Thank You again for the information!
 

KOPBET

F. J. B. Let's Go Brandon
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 28, 2008
Messages
10,482
Reaction score
3,750
Location
Zihuatanejo
I've always been a 'go big or go home' sort of guy which means that for me, being a licensed HAM operator would require at least NATIONWIDE, if not WORLDWIDE, access. But now that I live in an apartment I'm pretty sure that I would be limited to a relatively short range hand-held. I no longer drive, so even a potentially more powerful 'mobile' base would not be in the cards. Maybe I just need to lower my sights a bit. Again, thanks for your civil input, my friend.

You can talk around the world with a handheld. Just need Internet access.
 

turkeyrun

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Messages
5,455
Reaction score
2,447
Location
Where I am is where I'm at
Wif bought a table full of equipment at any estate auction. She thought she was bidding on a radio set. (So did every other bidder). Her surprise at getting the entire table, prompted a couple of bidders to ask about making a purchase.

There were 3 mics, she sold 2 for more than her winning bid. Sold several other pieces and talked with some people that acted like they knew the equipment


I have no idea the make or model, i think it was put in storage building. IIRC, there is a mic, receiver and another piece, but no transmitter or antenna.

She had some interest, when she bought it, but has never powered it up. Maybe one day, probably not.
 

Chuckie

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
1,130
Reaction score
1,124
Location
Midwest City, Oklahoma, 73110
Life in this country - and around the world - seems to be on the brink of having nothing more than ham radio to be aware of what's happening over there and around here. I'm 75 and I think it'll be upon us in my lifetime.

Woody
Let me fix that for you: Life in this country - and around the world - seems to be on the brink of having nothing more than ham radio to be aware of what's really happening over there and around here. I'm 75 and I think it'll be upon us in my lifetime.
 

ConstitutionCowboy

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Jul 5, 2006
Messages
5,560
Reaction score
3,731
Location
Kingfisher County
Let me fix that for you: Life in this country - and around the world - seems to be on the brink of having nothing more than ham radio to be aware of what's really happening over there and around here. I'm 75 and I think it'll be upon us in my lifetime.

Yeah, that's important. The really part.

Woody
 

ttown

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
2,923
Reaction score
1,599
Location
Oologah

Latest posts

Top Bottom