Dumb questions for today.

garytx

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Allowing the meat to sit allows the juices to stay in the steak.

If you're buying a "char broiled or flame grilled burger" you need catsup, mustard, mayo and BBQ sauce to cover up the taste of that nasty burger. Better yet, find a better place to purchase your hamburger.
 

wawazat

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Just because the muscle tissue is no longer attached to a living animal, doesnt mean it has no reaction to heat and cold. Depending on the cut and how I am cooking it, I will let it rest up to an hour before putting on fire so I dont shock the meat from cold to hot. The main exception to this is on thinner steaks. Letting it come up to room temp before putting it on the fire makes it almost impossible to get a good sear and still leave the middle medium rare.

The muscle fibers tense while cooking, so resting gives them time to relax a bit allows it to finish the cook as well as letting the muscle fibers relax so the juice doesnt get squeezed out onto the plate when it is cut.

If I am smoking meat, I plan it to be ready at least 1.5-2 hours early so I can wrap it back up in foil (shiny side in), a few bath towels, and toss it in an ice chest to finish the cook while I prep everything else for the meal. It will keep it hot for several hours so there is a lot less pressure trying to time quick cooking sides with a several hour smoke on the meat.
 

turkeyrun

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^^^^^^

1. Let the muscle relax and absorb some of those juices.

2. To cover the taste of the pink goo. THAT is not MEAT. Get some ground brisket, chuck, or sirloin and grill your own burger.
 

RickN

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Just because the muscle tissue is no longer attached to a living animal, doesnt mean it has no reaction to heat and cold. Depending on the cut and how I am cooking it, I will let it rest up to an hour before putting on fire so I dont shock the meat from cold to hot. The main exception to this is on thinner steaks. Letting it come up to room temp before putting it on the fire makes it almost impossible to get a good sear and still leave the middle medium rare.

The muscle fibers tense while cooking, so resting gives them time to relax a bit allows it to finish the cook as well as letting the muscle fibers relax so the juice doesnt get squeezed out onto the plate when it is cut.

If I am smoking meat, I plan it to be ready at least 1.5-2 hours early so I can wrap it back up in foil (shiny side in), a few bath towels, and toss it in an ice chest to finish the cook while I prep everything else for the meal. It will keep it hot for several hours so there is a lot less pressure trying to time quick cooking sides with a several hour smoke on the meat.
Thank you, that is the kind of answer I was hoping for.
 

p238shooter

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This site gives a pretty good explanation of the process. I have let pork butts and briskets rest wrapped in a cooler for 3-4 hours. Still hot when taking them out and very tender. Letting Meat Rest After Cooking: How It Works & Why It Makes Your Barbecue Better - The Virtual Weber Bullet

A couple very good smoking sites I use are BBQ-Brethren Homepage and my favorite huge site ran by a guy just outside of Tulsa Home

Searching eithor of these sites can give a wealth of information of what others have tried and how it came out. Like shooting, practice makes perfect. Good luck to you.
 

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