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H110 and .357Mag?

Discussion in 'Ammo & Reloading' started by Pulp, Jan 23, 2017.

  1. Pulp

    Pulp Sharpshooter

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    I bought some 110 grain JHP for .357. Hodgdons manual says 22 grains of H110 for starting load, 23 grains for max load. Even 22 grains is a compressed load. I reckon it's safe, since it is published data by the powder company, but I'm still a bit uneasy about it. I'm more used to loading black powder where compressed loads are necessary, but this is kinda scary to me.
    Anyone here use this powder?
    Another thing, Hodgdon has the exact same data for Win 296. Are they the same powders under different labels?
    FWIW the primary use for these will be in a Rossi '92 rifle.
     
  2. Glocktogo

    Glocktogo Sharpshooter

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    H110 and 296 are essentially the same powder. I've used a lot of both, in .357 and .44 mag loads. They are dangerous with too light a load due to ignition concerns and that's why min-max is less than 5% difference. They work well compressed, but a 110gr bullet with a compressed load of H110 is going to be extra flashy and blasty. :)

    FWIW, I usually cross reference load data from the bullet manufacturer, as cannelure location and jacket thickness can have a bearing on load data (unless the powder data specifically uses that specific brand and type of bullet).
     
  3. Pulp

    Pulp Sharpshooter

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    Thanks, the compression part really made me think twice about loading them. Just not used to that. If I'd been using TiteGroup you could probably still see the bottom of the case through the powder. Funny stuff this smokeless powder is! :)
    I'm looking for a load my grandson can use for deer hunting next year, I think that little Rossi would be a perfect beginner rifle. I also think I probably should have gone with 125 grain bullets instead of 110. But I've got nearly a year to play with different loads.

    The good news is the Hodgdon's data is with the Hornady 110 XTP that I'm using.
     
  4. Rod Snell

    Rod Snell Sharpshooter

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    I use Win296/H110 (same exact powder made in same factory, different package) for 158gr deer loads in .357 shot in 8" S&W 686, but don't like it for lighter bullets and shorter barrels.
    You need to get a 158gr soft point for hunting. ;)
     
  5. Shadowrider

    Shadowrider Sharpshooter

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    Like GTG said, it's okay to run compressed. Make sure your bullets have a cannelure and roll crimp into it pretty heavily. I can say it's pretty forgiving with 125s and 158s as to going over pressure, I don't think I ever did. Also watch what gun you shoot those 110s out of, some S&Ws don't like them at all. All K frames and the newer titanium cylinder numbers. L and N frames should be fine and Rugers shouldn't have a problem with them. Winchester used 296 in their factor magnum loads for years, maybe still do?

    Edit to add: I'll 2nd Rod Snell. You need a heavier bullet for deer. 158 XTP would work great.
     
  6. Owlcreekok

    Owlcreekok Marksman

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    I learned me something here ! Didn' know H110 and WW 296 was same thing. Cool. I gave away a pound of 110 a few years ago after trying a few loads in .357. It worked the revolver and me both way too hard. lol.

    I have used 296 in .44 mag once upon a time. Back when I could see well enough to shoot handgun silhouette. The recipe was simply all you could scoop in a case and get the bullet in far enough to clear the frame when the cylinder advanced. heh heh.
     
  7. NikatKimber

    NikatKimber Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Now that I've got a chronograph, I need to find a convenient place to shoot regularly; so I can go out and compare different powders vs barrel lengths. I've only got 2 3/4" and 4" .357 Mags, so I don't want to run H110/W296 (which is a slow burner compared to many pistol powders) if I don't get much more than extra flash and bang vs a faster powder.
     
  8. Larry Morgan

    Larry Morgan Sharpshooter

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    Definitely. If you want to save your wrist a little, you can run Longshot, which is a bit faster burning. Still gives a very good punch in magnum handgun loads, but isn't quite as sharp. It's about 300ft/s slower with a 110gr in .357 magnum.

    Edit: Lol. Just read it's for a Rossi. In that case, it might not matter as much. :-)
     
  9. dennishoddy

    dennishoddy Sharpshooter

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    H-110 recommends magnum primers for proper ignition in .44 mag loads I shoot.
    Not sure on compressed .357 loads.
     
  10. Matt52

    Matt52 Marksman

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    110/296 are true Magnum powders, you'll want (especially for compressed loads) a Magnum primer.
     

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