1. Welcome to Oklahoma Shooters Association! Join today, registration is easy!

    You can register using your Google, Facebook, or Twitter account, just click here.

HAM operators

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by LinearZero, Jan 1, 2019.

Tags:
  1. kd5rjz

    kd5rjz Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    3,431
    Likes Received:
    41
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Rating
    100%
    I would suggest the W5YI study guide as a resource to ace the test quickly, and the ARRL study guide to learn the material at a slower pace, but more thoroughly.

    W5YI: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0945053908/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_mdTlCbYYPF3CS


    ARRL:
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/1625950829/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_1gTlCbMZ5NF7Q

     
  2. p238shooter

    p238shooter Sharpshooter

    Supporter
    Messages:
    2,441
    Likes Received:
    650
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2012
    Location:
    East of Tulsa
    If you are serious about getting your license but having a little bit of a hard time understanding the why's for some of the questions or are limited on study time to figure it all out, I suggest you take a good look at this.

    Do a google search for hamtestonline (one word no spaces) it will take you to https://www.hamradiolicenseexam.com and give it a try. Yes, $24.95 for the Tech course, but it not only gives you the questions and answers, it drills it into you and makes you learn it, each question has a place to click that will take you to the "Why" each question has that correct answer.

    You can do about 25% for free to try it out. It is hands down the best study tool out there for actually learning the why for each question. Many different options and ways you can set it up to practice for the exam. If you register even for the free part it will take you to where you left off the last time you were logged in.

    My blond ex-wife with absolutely no preknowledge passed her Technician license missing only one question studying 10 hours in a two week period of time. I highly recommend it for the Tech license and his upgrades to General and Extra as well. He makes it easy to really learn the material.

    I personally know at least 20 hams that have used this course. Not a single one had a complaint or failed their Tech test or upgrades on the first try. It just works. JMO like everyone has naturally. WB5Y
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2019
    Poke78 likes this.
  3. MacFromOK

    MacFromOK Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    7,542
    Likes Received:
    6,449
    Joined:
    May 11, 2016
    Location:
    Southern Oklahoma
    Rating
    100%
    You might check if there are any HAM clubs in your area.

    They can (and usually will gladly) help you with the particulars of getting a license.
    :drunk2:
     
  4. Dave70968

    Dave70968 Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    6,678
    Likes Received:
    4,593
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    Location:
    Norman
    Here are several amateur radio clubs in the Tulsa area; I don't know the geography up there, so I don't know which is closest to you, but I'll bet if you contact just about any of them, they'll be able to give you some more information. More than likely, at least one will be running free classes. I know the South Canadian Amateur Radio Society (SCARS) does, as well as running test sessions on a regular basis.

    http://w5ias.com/
    http://www.tulsahamradio.org/
    http://w5drz.org/
    http://www.arrl.org/Groups/view/tulsa-community-college-arc-tcc-arc

    (For those in Norman/Moore/south OKC, SCARS meets at the fire station at Norman Westheimer, and its website is https://w5nor.org/ ).
     
    jrusling likes this.
  5. Dave70968

    Dave70968 Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    6,678
    Likes Received:
    4,593
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    Location:
    Norman
    Addendum to previous:

    SCARS is starting new Technician/General classes on 5 Feb (Tuesday). The syllabus, along with links to several test prep sites and the question pool, is at https://w5nor.org/class/ (it references the 2018 class, but the Events page at https://w5nor.org/class/ gives the 2019 date). I think it's about time I upgrade to General anyway, so I'l be there.

    I'm also thinking of picking up a couple of their Pixie 40 meter kits (https://w5nor.org/pixie/). At ten quid, they're dirt cheap, and they're a fun way to get started as well as work on your soldering skills and Morse code. Things like this are great projects for winter when you'd rather be indoors anyway. If anybody wants me to pick one up, I'd be happy to do so for FTF exchange, or by mail on your dime. If we get enough people interested, we might even be able to get an OSA net going from time to time. SCARS runs several scheduled nets, listed at https://w5nor.org/meetings/ along with the regular, in-person meetings.
     
  6. kd5rjz

    kd5rjz Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    3,431
    Likes Received:
    41
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Location:
    Tulsa, OK
    Rating
    100%
    I have Pixie kits (and some other kits) in Tulsa if you need one. I also have most common rf adaptors in stock.

     
  7. KOPBET

    KOPBET Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    8,524
    Likes Received:
    930
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
    Location:
    Zihuatanejo
    I got a Technician Plus (which later was adjusted to simply Technician) license back in ‘91 (I won’t put my call here since I don’t want my home address exposed so conveniently to the world). Back then of course you had to pass the Novice first and also a 5 wpm code exam. Don’t remember what the code requirement was back then for General but IIRC that code kind of hindered my progress. I also have a non-expiring FCC Radio Telephone Operator license with Ship Radar Endorsement. I’ve been out of the game since before I renewed the first time in 2001. I know things have changed quite a bit since then so maybe starting afresh with the basics wouldn’t hurt since I’m pretty rusty on the theory. After that, work towards General again. Retirement isn’t that far away so maybe it’ll give me something to do. Thanks to all of you that posted class and study info.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2019
  8. Dave70968

    Dave70968 Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    6,678
    Likes Received:
    4,593
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2010
    Location:
    Norman
    It was 13 WPM for General, 20 WPM for Extra. I don't recall Advanced (which no longer exists). You could also do a no-code tech which was the Novice and Tech written elements with no code; it was VHF/UHF/microwave only (no HF privileges). Since the ITU requirement for code disappeared, the FCC followed suit and dropped it as well, so all three license classes (down from 5½) are available without code.

    You should still learn it, though; it's by far the simplest and most power-efficient way to communicate, making it the most reliable under adverse conditions.
     
  9. KOPBET

    KOPBET Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    8,524
    Likes Received:
    930
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2008
    Location:
    Zihuatanejo

    Thanks for refreshing my memory. Thirty years (almost) and a stroke has dulled it somewhat. I agree on learning the code though. Passing 5 wpm was what at the time seemed like a major milestone but I got it done. Now a days the tinnitus will likely impede my progress once again.
     
  10. Raptor62

    Raptor62 Marksman

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Location:
    OKC
    The cool thing for me is HRD ham radio deluxe software. Hook your radio to the computer via USB and send and receive morse code via the keyboard.
    For someone learning there are free programs for doing this and HRD is free to try. ARRL broadcast 5 wpm on a schedule.
    I love using the computer on these digital modes.

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page