Home Propane Tank Mount/Base?

Bocephus123

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More questions for the newbie country livin' guy.

We have a 1000 gallon propane tank I bought refurbished that will feed our new 24kw standby generator getting installed next week. We will, over time, convert a lot of our home appliances over from electric to propane. Currently whole house is electric and don't care for that. So, I see tanks of all sizes just sitting in yards with the tank's feet sitting on concrete blocks, paver stones or whatever flat hard surface the homeowner had laying around. Rarely see them actually bolted down to a concrete pad or whatnot. My original plan was to forum up two 12"W x 12H "x 4'L concrete "beam" with anchor bolts stubbed up to bolt the feet down. My thought is this will keep the tank off the dirt/grass and give it a bit more sturdy footing andkeeping it in place. With time and energy being so valuable at this time I'm looking to do something else. My next thought was to go buy two best condition railroad ties I could find. Cut them to about 5' long and drill two holes in each one to match the tank's feet down. Would be a one day project rather than take 5 times as long to do the concrete beams.

Do you all think this is a reliable way to keep the tank secure on the ground, etc? I would think the railroad ties would give me 10-15 years of serviceable life before they would need to be replaced. What do you think and what have you all done with your tanks?
get some post hole diggers or an auger make you 4 little piers as deep as you like put a single piece of grade 8 all thread for each foot will hold all you need!!
 

OK Corgi Rancher

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Are you sure? I thought if there is cathodic protection or sacrificial anodes, a steel tank would work fine. The tank might need different valve connections, but the tanks I’ve seen installed don’t appear to be different.

It's not safe and it's not legal to bury a propane tank designed for above ground use.

They use the same valves and fittings but they're located differently. The also use a different coating and need a tower/riser to protect everything (in addition to the cathodic protection).

You'd also have to be very careful about the location of the tank because they can float. You'd need to anchor them or bury the feet in cement before you cover the tank. You should also cover the tank with some sort of non-abrasive material (like sand) before backfilling because rocks and other debris can compromise the protective coating and could render the cathodic protective bag useless against corrosion.
 

OK Corgi Rancher

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@Parks 788 There's a lot of bad/uninformed advice here. That's the danger of asking this sort of question on a gun forum. You should consult a qualified company about your tank installation if you're concerned about it. Many times they'll help you for free or for a minimal install fee if you're a customer. It's also good to establish a good relationship with your propane company. You'd be surprised how helpful they can be. I worked for a big/nationally known propane company for 10 years...mostly just as a delivery driver but also did some install work. I'm not an expert but I know the basics of tanks, placement and install.

Ask a pro...they'll come out to your house and take care of you and do it right.
 

StLPro2A

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More questions for the newbie country livin' guy.

We have a 1000 gallon propane tank I bought refurbished that will feed our new 24kw standby generator getting installed next week. We will, over time, convert a lot of our home appliances over from electric to propane. Currently whole house is electric and don't care for that. So, I see tanks of all sizes just sitting in yards with the tank's feet sitting on concrete blocks, paver stones or whatever flat hard surface the homeowner had laying around. Rarely see them actually bolted down to a concrete pad or whatnot. My original plan was to forum up two 12"W x 12H "x 4'L concrete "beam" with anchor bolts stubbed up to bolt the feet down. My thought is this will keep the tank off the dirt/grass and give it a bit more sturdy footing andkeeping it in place. With time and energy being so valuable at this time I'm looking to do something else. My next thought was to go buy two best condition railroad ties I could find. Cut them to about 5' long and drill two holes in each one to match the tank's feet down. Would be a one day project rather than take 5 times as long to do the concrete beams.

Do you all think this is a reliable way to keep the tank secure on the ground, etc? I would think the railroad ties would give me 10-15 years of serviceable life before they would need to be replaced. What do you think and what have you all done with your tanks?
Your topic caught my eye. Considering dumping local natural gas supplier switching to propane. Pondering placing propane tank. Nothing but problems with gas company. No one living in one of my houses since 10/21 (initially RV snowbird escape turned into 3 family hospice journey support events, compounded by 3 kids orphaned), water heater shut off, furnace on 40F during winter. Gas company jacked "estimated" usage higher than any month last occupied three years. Wanted access to check meter (meter and regulator in basement). Multiple responses telling them why use was so low, no one in town with access...not coming back 800-1100miles one way to pacify them. They state they are concerned for leak situation....leak would not be lower consumption....DUH. Can't talk to them, to resolve, threatening shut off service. Want service available as out-of-town friends/family have often used house during visits/medical issues. Understanding switch needs tank set/connected, switch appliances to propane, metering, and open account with local propane dealer. Call for refills as needed. No monthly account charges?? Any other issues to be addressed?
 

SlugSlinger

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It's not safe and it's not legal to bury a propane tank designed for above ground use.

They use the same valves and fittings but they're located differently. The also use a different coating and need a tower/riser to protect everything (in addition to the cathodic protection).

You'd also have to be very careful about the location of the tank because they can float. You'd need to anchor them or bury the feet in cement before you cover the tank. You should also cover the tank with some sort of non-abrasive material (like sand) before backfilling because rocks and other debris can compromise the protective coating and could render the cathodic protective bag useless against corrosion.
I would have bought a tank to bury. And not an above ground. I looked at the possibility when installed my generator., but kept with the preinstalled natural gas supply.

Are you a propane expert selling propane and propane accessories?

C383EE58-A634-4FA6-9080-6E15E39F5DE9.jpeg
 

OK Corgi Rancher

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Snattlerake

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I have to warn you propane tanks float. I used to live in Kingfisher County so you all know when it sprinkles a bit the Turkey Creek and the Cimarron River always meet in Dover and Uncle John's Creek and the Kingfisher Creek meet in Kingfisher. I have seen about 15 to 20 farm propane tanks piled up against fences and hedgerows after the floods.
 

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