I'll soon be selling a few of my hand guns. Top shelf and I'll be fair on the prices

druryj

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I collect post-war Walther PPKs and PPK/S pistols. I currently have 9 of them; in .22lr, 32ACP, and 380 ACP. My favorites are my PPK-L (Dural; or Aluminum) framed PPKs in both .22lr and 32 ACP. Quite rare little pistols and quite expensive if you can find one in good condition. Mine both look like new. They are incredibly accurate little pistols and a joy to shoot. I have one Interarms stainless PPK/S in .32CP; the rest of my collection were made in West Germany or France (Manurhins). I have a West German PPK/S in .380 that looks like it just came off the line, even though it is dated as a 1968 model. I have a beautiful Manurhin PPK/s, also in .380, that is a joy to handle, and has the sweetest SA trigger ever on a DA/SA pistol. These guns were all put together by people who knew how to hand finish a pistol; back before the day of CNC and mass machining. To me, the whole PP seriers was an amazing inroad on the develpoment of handguns, first introduced in 1929 with the Walther PP and then in 1931 with the PPK. The PPK/S came about as a result of the 1968 Gun Control Act, which halted the import of many small pistols, the PPK included. My interest is with those produced post-WWII; either by the French company Manurhin, proofed in St. Ettiene, France, or by Walther, proofed in Ulm, Germany. Actually, from right after the war up until 1986, all the parts for these pistols were really made by Manurhin; some were proofed in St. Etienne, France, and some were shipped as parts to Ulm, in what that was then West Germany, to be hardened and proofed in Ulm. My collection is conservativelly valued at about $15,000. What am I going to do? Gift them them to my grandson, in the hopes he will appreciate them as much as I have and do.

I have zero interest in the "Walther" pistols briefly made by S&W in Houlton, ME or in Springfield, MA and even less in the new models of the gun from Ft. Smith, AR. THe changes made to the pistol are horribly ugly and denigrate the classic lines of a classic gun to a great degree. That horrendous beavertail on the new models sets a lot of us Walther guys off.
 

FrankNmac

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Thank you, Grandpaw! I will come and visit this weekend. :wink2:



I collect post-war Walther PPKs and PPK/S pistols. I currently have 9 of them; in .22lr, 32ACP, and 380 ACP. My favorites are my PPK-L (Dural; or Aluminum) framed PPKs in both .22lr and 32 ACP. Quite rare little pistols and quite expensive if you can find one in good condition. Mine both look like new. They are incredibly accurate little pistols and a joy to shoot. I have one Interarms stainless PPK/S in .32CP; the rest of my collection were made in West Germany or France (Manurhins). I have a West German PPK/S in .380 that looks like it just came off the line, even though it is dated as a 1968 model. I have a beautiful Manurhin PPK/s, also in .380, that is a joy to handle, and has the sweetest SA trigger ever on a DA/SA pistol. These guns were all put together by people who knew how to hand finish a pistol; back before the day of CNC and mass machining. To me, the whole PP seriers was an amazing inroad on the develpoment of handguns, first introduced in 1929 with the Walther PP and then in 1931 with the PPK. The PPK/S came about as a result of the 1968 Gun Control Act, which halted the import of many small pistols, the PPK included. My interest is with those produced post-WWII; either by the French company Manurhin, proofed in St. Ettiene, France, or by Walther, proofed in Ulm, Germany. Actually, from right after the war up until 1986, all the parts for these pistols were really made by Manurhin; some were proofed in St. Etienne, France, and some were shipped as parts to Ulm, in what that was then West Germany, to be hardened and proofed in Ulm. My collection is conservativelly valued at about $15,000. What am I going to do? Gift them them to my grandson, in the hopes he will appreciate them as much as I have and do.
 

okierider

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I collect post-war Walther PPKs and PPK/S pistols. I currently have 9 of them; in .22lr, 32ACP, and 380 ACP. My favorites are my PPK-L (Dural; or Aluminum) framed PPKs in both .22lr and 32 ACP. Quite rare little pistols and quite expensive if you can find one in good condition. Mine both look like new. They are incredibly accurate little pistols and a joy to shoot. I have one Interarms stainless PPK/S in .32CP; the rest of my collection were made in West Germany or France (Manurhins). I have a West German PPK/S in .380 that looks like it just came off the line, even though it is dated as a 1968 model. I have a beautiful Manurhin PPK/s, also in .380, that is a joy to handle, and has the sweetest SA trigger ever on a DA/SA pistol. These guns were all put together by people who knew how to hand finish a pistol; back before the day of CNC and mass machining. To me, the whole PP seriers was an amazing inroad on the develpoment of handguns, first introduced in 1929 with the Walther PP and then in 1931 with the PPK. The PPK/S came about as a result of the 1968 Gun Control Act, which halted the import of many small pistols, the PPK included. My interest is with those produced post-WWII; either by the French company Manurhin, proofed in St. Ettiene, France, or by Walther, proofed in Ulm, Germany. Actually, from right after the war up until 1986, all the parts for these pistols were really made by Manurhin; some were proofed in St. Etienne, France, and some were shipped as parts to Ulm, in what that was then West Germany, to be hardened and proofed in Ulm. My collection is conservativelly valued at about $15,000. What am I going to do? Gift them them to my grandson, in the hopes he will appreciate them as much as I have and do.

I have zero interest in the "Walther" pistols briefly made by S&W in Houlton, ME or in Springfield, MA and even less in the new models of the gun from Ft. Smith, AR. THe changes made to the pistol are horribly ugly and denigrate the classic lines of a classic gun to a great degree. That horrendous beavertail on the new models sets a lot of us Wather guys off.

You and @Catt57 need to get together and support each other to kick that hoarding habit you have developed!! At least you ain't saving well used depends so there is hope for ya!!!! :cool:
 

Gunbuffer

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I collect post-war Walther PPKs and PPK/S pistols. I currently have 9 of them; in .22lr, 32ACP, and 380 ACP. My favorites are my PPK-L (Dural; or Aluminum) framed PPKs in both .22lr and 32 ACP. Quite rare little pistols and quite expensive if you can find one in good condition. Mine both look like new. They are incredibly accurate little pistols and a joy to shoot. I have one Interarms stainless PPK/S in .32CP; the rest of my collection were made in West Germany or France (Manurhins). I have a West German PPK/S in .380 that looks like it just came off the line, even though it is dated as a 1968 model. I have a beautiful Manurhin PPK/s, also in .380, that is a joy to handle, and has the sweetest SA trigger ever on a DA/SA pistol. These guns were all put together by people who knew how to hand finish a pistol; back before the day of CNC and mass machining. To me, the whole PP seriers was an amazing inroad on the develpoment of handguns, first introduced in 1929 with the Walther PP and then in 1931 with the PPK. The PPK/S came about as a result of the 1968 Gun Control Act, which halted the import of many small pistols, the PPK included. My interest is with those produced post-WWII; either by the French company Manurhin, proofed in St. Ettiene, France, or by Walther, proofed in Ulm, Germany. Actually, from right after the war up until 1986, all the parts for these pistols were really made by Manurhin; some were proofed in St. Etienne, France, and some were shipped as parts to Ulm, in what that was then West Germany, to be hardened and proofed in Ulm. My collection is conservativelly valued at about $15,000. What am I going to do? Gift them them to my grandson, in the hopes he will appreciate them as much as I have and do.

I have zero interest in the "Walther" pistols briefly made by S&W in Houlton, ME or in Springfield, MA and even less in the new models of the gun from Ft. Smith, AR. THe changes made to the pistol are horribly ugly and denigrate the classic lines of a classic gun to a great degree. That horrendous beavertail on the new models sets a lot of us Wather guys off.
Early in my handgun days I briefly owned a interarms in 380. All I can recall about it is that the frame was had edges so sharp you could shave with it
 

druryj

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Early in my handgun days I briefly owned a interarms in 380. All I can recall about it is that the frame was had edges so sharp you could shave with it

They willl certainly bite you if you don't hold onto them like you mean it. The fixed barrel of these pistols gives you great accuracy but a bit more felt recoil than most would suspect.
 

okierider

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Early in my handgun days I briefly owned a interarms in 380. All I can recall about it is that the frame was had edges so sharp you could shave with it
I have a FEG clone that is a great pistol. It is the steel frame version and solid!
 

Catt57

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You and @Catt57 need to get together and support each other to kick that hoarding habit you have developed!! At least you ain't saving well used depends so there is hope for ya!!!! :cool:

We would just end up encouraging each other more....,,

At least my habit is usually cheaper than @druryj `s
 

THAT Gurl

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I told my wife if I pass before her to get on this site and ask for help selling any guns she does not want to keep for herself. Told her people like That Girl and most the rest of you guys would help her find fair prices.

When LoneWolf'49 passed we (and another gun couple) spent the day helping his wife figure out what he had stashed and what it was worth. Then when folks started showing up to buy stuff I got so mad I could have bit the heads off a bunch of nails. Some guys (even some guys from here) are just assholes. They were low-balling her like crazy. I will NOT let that happen to Mrs. RickN. You tell her to call me and Scott. I'll kick ass and name names ... That kind of stuff infuriates me.
 

Perplexed

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I told my wife if I pass before her to get on this site and ask for help selling any guns she does not want to keep for herself. Told her people like That Girl and most the rest of you guys would help her find fair prices.

Why not keep a spreadsheet listing your firearms and current market prices of each, and update it periodically? That way when you kick the bucket at the ripe old age of 100+, your wife can use the spreadsheet as a reference while selling stuff.
 
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