Lets talk about firearms in National Parks

HiredHand

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I’d think anyone that spends time in the back country like that should probably educate themselves on the topic of human and bear interactions or for that matter any animal that might choose to attack a human. I’d probably buy the bear spray and a few training canisters to practice with beforehand.
 

dennishoddy

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I’d think anyone that spends time in the back country like that should probably educate themselves on the topic of human and bear interactions or for that matter any animal that might choose to attack a human. I’d probably buy the bear spray and a few training canisters to practice with beforehand.
Definitely good advice.
We are used to spending lots of time in bear country during the summers and knowing the precautions while in the woods, but it's always been black bear country. More of a nuisance than anything, but there is the occasional attack we read about. What's interesting is that a lot of the attacks in Colorado and New Mexico from black bears are in suburban areas near cities.
A couple of the attacks last year, one in Colorado and the other in New Mexico were a guy walking his dog after dark and the other was a lady taking out trash. Easy food sources around cities.
 

Beau B

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I’ve never carried while backpacking, usually have some bear spray. Last time I went out I was with my brother and nephew and we saw some signs on the trail warning of an aggressive black bear in the area. I was happy I had the spray but also wished I had a gun! Figured I’d take the weight penalty the next time out and bring one along.
I actually bought a lightweight.357 specifically for hiking and fishing in Colorado but I sold it a while ago. Need to pick another one up I guess.
 

uncle money bags

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Ill trust an aerosol can for a lot of things, but none of them are life saving situations. A possible exception would be an unpressurized vessel that can be charged at the moment of need from something like a CO2 cartridge like certain life vests.
Are there any bear spray aerosol products that will work regardless of elevation or temperature changes?
I can see it as a tertiary backup to
1. Environmental knowledge.
2. An adequate firearm.
 

dennishoddy

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Ill trust an aerosol can for a lot of things, but none of them are life saving situations. A possible exception would be an unpressurized vessel that can be charged at the moment of need from something like a CO2 cartridge like certain life vests.
Are there any bear spray aerosol products that will work regardless of elevation or temperature changes?
I can see it as a tertiary backup to
1. Environmental knowledge.
2. An adequate firearm.

I’m betting the bear sprays sold in the high country are equipped to handle that altitude.
 

HiredHand

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Via National Parks Service Facebook page:


If a bear clacks its teeth, sticks out its lips, huffs, woofs, or slaps the ground with its paws, it is warning you that you are too close and are making it nervous. The bear’s nervous? Heed this warning and slowly back away. ⁣What else should you do or not do if you come across a bear in Yellowstone?

Do not immediately drop to the ground and “play dead.” Bears can sense overacting.⁣

Do not run, shout, or make sudden movements. ⁣

Do not run up and push the bear and do not push a slower friend down…even if you feel the friendship has run its course.⁣

Running may trigger a chase response in the bear and you can't outrun a bear. Bears in Yellowstone chase down elk calves all the time. You do not want to look like a slow elk calf. (Apologies to the elk calf.)⁣

Slowly putting distance between yourself and the bear may defuse the situation. ⁣

Draw your bear spray from the holster, remove the safety tab, and prepare to use it if the bear charges.⁣

In most cases, climbing a tree is a poor decision. Bears can climb trees (especially if there is something up the tree that the bear wants). Also, when was the last time you climbed a tree?⁣

Running to a tree or frantically climbing a tree may provoke a bear to chase you. If the friend you pushed down somehow made it up a tree and is now extending you a hand, there’s a good chance you’re not getting up that tree. Karma’s a bear. ⁣

Learn more bear safety tips at https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/bearreact.htm

Image: Close-up if Grizzly Bear near Swan Lake in Yellowstone National Park. NPS/Neal Herbert ⁣
 
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