Missouri girl, 14, thought she was shooting a deer when she pulled the trigger

Pokinfun

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I was bow hunting on Ft Sill 20 years ago and had an elk walk out of some brush about 30 yards out from my stand. I had been listening to it move around and getting peeks at it for 10 minutes before it stepped out of some briars. I was at a full draw when I realized it was an elk.

I bet she gets a fine, but no suspension of hunting privileges.
 

dennishoddy

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I was bow hunting on Ft Sill 20 years ago and had an elk walk out of some brush about 30 yards out from my stand. I had been listening to it move around and getting peeks at it for 10 minutes before it stepped out of some briers. I was at a full draw when I realized it was an elk.

I bet she gets a fine, but no suspension of hunting privileges.
At her age, it should be a teaching moment, not a loss of privileges, so I agree.
 

Poke78

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Link to today's article:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/w...hot-elk/ar-BBEZKru?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp

Key excerpts:

"There is no elk season in Missouri, so free ranging elk are protected," said Tom Strother, an MDC Protection Regional Supervisor. "It is a Wildlife Code violation to shoot a free ranging elk as there are no provisions that outline a hunting season like there is for white-tailed deer."

As of Tuesday, conservation officials had not finished their investigation into the unusual case or decided whether warnings will be issued.

Tom Strother, an MDC Protection Regional Supervisor, said staff talked to White on Monday "and informed him that no parts of the elk will be returned to him or the family."
 

Fredkrueger100

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Honest mistake. They did the right thing and called it in. Give the kid a break. Let her keep it.
I saw this happen repeatedly on north woods law. People made a mistake, called it in and usually the jerk game warden ended up giving them a ticket. They never once let them keep anything. I guess people are supposed to be robots when hunting.
 

dennishoddy

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I saw this happen repeatedly on north woods law. People made a mistake, called it in and usually the jerk game warden ended up giving them a ticket. They never once let them keep anything. I guess people are supposed to be robots when hunting.
No, as a hunter, you are responsible to make sure the animal/fowl your hunting is the specie that your allowed to kill. That's why we have game laws.
The ones that called it in are responsible hunters that recognize they made a mistake and are willing to pay the price for it.
Law/game enforcement cannot allow the person making the mistake to keep the meat or antlers as that would encourage poaching.
As discussed earlier, I can see a fine in her future, but hope she doesn't lose hunting privileges.
If it goes south, she could be charged to replace the animal with another depending on the age and popularity of the animal.
Oklahoma and other states do this.
To buy an elk to replace the one she shot can run into the many thousands of dollars.
Poachers beware, the fine is the cheapest thing you might have to pay.
 

Parks 788

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No, it's not. I wouldn't attack a novice hunter of any age for that mistake, nor would many others here.

Who said anything about attacking her. If you give a hunter a firearm to hunt a game animal you should make sure said hunter/person has the knowledge and wherewithal to properly use the firearm. Like I said, she broke a cardinal rule of firearms handling. Luckily for her it was only an elk that was mis identified. For absolutely zero to happen to her is setting a poor example for other young hunters. It's life, there are consequences for your mistakes.
 

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