Modify what I have, or sell and buy something else?

MacFromOK

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Thoughts on a switch barrel build?

One stock, one optic, multiple calibers. So switch barrel it is. But I don’t have a sky high budget like many do for custom switch barrel rifles. I also am having a hard time bringing myself to purchase a custom action. So here’s my thought: buy a Remington 700sps tactical in 308, buy the West Texas Ordinance switch lug system, and get the factory barrel machined to match up, as well as a lighter profile 223 barrel with matching bolt for song dogs. As time goes on and I find more funds, I buy a timney trigger, new stock with pillars and bedding, etc.

The end hope is that I can build myself the perfect setup over time, and any time I want a new caliber, I just purchase a new barrel/bolt face. High buy in costs, but hopefully saving a little cash in the long run when we look at buying new optics, accessories, stocks, etc for new platforms.
How expensive is the basic assembly that get used with every caliber? If it craters (faulty load, ran over by a truck, whatever) then all of your calibers are out of business.

Just a thought.
___
 

HoLeChit

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How expensive is the basic assembly that get used with every caliber? If it craters (faulty load, ran over by a truck, whatever) then all of your calibers are out of business.

Just a thought.
___
Just under 900 for the action I’m considering now. Less than a worked over rem700 action, about the same price as buying a pacific tool blueprinted rem700 action.

it’s definitely pricey, and the cost of entry has me hesitating, but buying one action, one stock, one trigger, and one optic is going to be much cheaper in the long run than buying those things for most rifles I buy. Instead of buying a whole new everything each time I want a different platform/caliber, I just have to buy a $500 prefit barrel and maybe a new $125 bolt face. If I build a custom rifle in the way I’m thinking, it’s likely going to run me $3500-4000 all said and done with an optic, 4 barrels, and 3 bolt faces. That’s roughly 4 rifles custom fit to what I need/want. On the other side of the coin, when I buy a new platform, I typically buy repair parts as well. This would not only reduce the cost/stockpile of repair parts, but also reduce the number of accessories purchased. My cheap PSA AR fully set up for predator hunting with a cheap scope cost me $1000. My Ruger American Ranch in 762x39 has about $1000 end price tag. My Howa 308 represents about $1700 in cash out of my pocket, my Howa 223 is another 1400, and so on. None of these are particularly fancy rifles, but when buying parts, accessories, mags, optics, and the like the price really adds up. And I don’t even buy expensive optics. My top 2 most expensive optics cost me $500 and $700.

And the thing you can’t put a price on: uniqueness. I was talking with @CutBaitNBlowSh*tUp4ALivin just now, and I realized that with this build I could likely build a high quality precision 762x39 AND one of the first 9x39 bolt guns that I’ve ever even heard of. Those are two things you cannot buy.

it all breaks down to money though. For $4000 I could build a custom tailored platform that COULD (but probably won’t) replace several basic/affordable firearms that together would cost much more.
 
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Cold Smoke

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There’s a whole new way of regarding firearms that is completely alien to us old guys. One fella from South Africa I kind of follow on the yoot tubes kind of blew my mind when I saw his shooting room. He keeps the barreled actions on pegs on the wall. His optics are all arranged in cradles in a deep drawer cabinet along with triggers, magazines, bipods etc. The various chassis are in an ordered area etc. Whenever he’s going to a shoot he puts together what he needs using torque tools and dials in his DOPE, verifies zero and he’s off and running. It’s so counter to the traditional cabinet or rack of assembled rifles that I had to stare at it for a minute. In this age of data with the precision that’s available to the laity, the sky is the limit. I love me some high polish blue steel nestled in fantastic walnut, but for purely putting projectiles on location from a distance it’s a whole new world.
 

HoLeChit

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There’s a whole new way of regarding firearms that is completely alien to us old guys. One fella from South Africa I kind of follow on the yoot tubes kind of blew my mind when I saw his shooting room. He keeps the barreled actions on pegs on the wall. His optics are all arranged in cradles in a deep drawer cabinet along with triggers, magazines, bipods etc. The various chassis are in an ordered area etc. Whenever he’s going to a shoot he puts together what he needs using torque tools and dials in his DOPE, verifies zero and he’s off and running. It’s so counter to the traditional cabinet or rack of assembled rifles that I had to stare at it for a minute. In this age of data with the precision that’s available to the laity, the sky is the limit. I love me some high polish blue steel nestled in fantastic walnut, but for purely putting projectiles on location from a distance it’s a whole new world.
I want to say that it was New Zealand or England or something where you could only own a certain amount of long guns. How they get around that law is with switch barrel platforms. It kinda got me hooked on the idea. You could theoretically have all your rifle needs taken care of with a rimfire action, a short action, and a long action where you could switch up calibers geared towards what you’re shooting. While the initial cost is high, the long term savings and familiarity of using the same optic and stock for everything is appealing. All of my current optics are different. So there’s different learning curves for every one of my rifles in terms of the optic, the ballistics, how the rifle handles, and how the rifle functions. While it keeps things interesting, it’s not optimal.

There’s definitely something to be said about the classics, which I love and respect, but the modularity we are seeing in firearms nowadays is a great thing to take advantage of. I feel like so much of the industry is driven by trends, and as my tastes/needs get more specific, it becomes harder to find something that works for me. Too much tactical, too many bull barrels (which I love for many things), too many crappy plastic stocks. Everything is built to a price point, or just gets really expensive/crazy from the get go. It’s hard to find a good middle of the road.
 

crrcboatz

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I think Howa makes a barreled action that would fit the bill, you would just need to find one in stock. My 20” Howa 308 heavy barrel is a fantastic shooter.

I feel you on seeking familiarity. There’s other calibers that would work better predator hunting, but the 223 is no slouch and my familiarity with the ballistics and such is a huge plus to me.
They Do! I ordered one in a different caliber but the selection at the time I bought mine was quite good!
 

Cold Smoke

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This is truly the golden age if firearms. I wonder what O’Connor would have to say if he could look around now.

I have a friend who is printing groups you can cover with your hand at a mile. Twenty thirty years ago even talking about that would get you locked in a fully upholstered apartment.

I looked into Blasers several years ago but couldn’t afford my lack of focus.
 

crrcboatz

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I cut my .880" diameter .308 barrel from 24" to 20.5" and not a lot of weight removed but I will say it swung and handled like I took 5 lbs off of the end of it.
My 18" .308 is even better.
Balance may go farther than the actual weight reduction.
I can't confirm I only know it handled much better.
Have a 19.5 inch custom built 700 that fills u r bill if interested
 

HoLeChit

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This is truly the golden age if firearms. I wonder what O’Connor would have to say if he could look around now.

I have a friend who is printing groups you can cover with your hand at a mile. Twenty thirty years ago even talking about that would get you locked in a fully upholstered apartment.

I looked into Blasers several years ago but couldn’t afford my lack of focus.
I agree, it’s insane how far we have come. There’s a guy selling a pair of benchrest rifles on the long range hunting forums that print under 4.5” at 1000 yards. Roughly under .045 MOA if I’m doing my math right. That’s just unreal to me.
 

El Pablo

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4.5 in at 1000 is .45 moa

The tx state record is insane
 
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HoLeChit

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So I’ve made up my mind on things. Do any of you have the following stocks? I wanna touch them before buying if at all possible.

KRG bravo
Grayboe Phoenix
AG composites Privateer
AG composites Alpine Hunter
AG composites Sportsman
 

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