New question at an Integris doctor's appointment ...

JD8

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 13, 2005
Messages
27,888
Reaction score
25,938
Location
Tulsa
They're trying to eliminate a step in their mandated routine. The provider (doctor, nurse practitioner, physician assistant) has to dictate their daily patient's charts so the people in the transcription department can log the events.

If they can simply record the office visit, they can eliminate that step.

There's nothing wrong with the request, because everything that goes on in the doctor's office is going down on paper either way. Either you let them record it on tape, or they're going to record it on paper. No big deal.

What do you think your patient's chart is?

If you don't trust your doctor, (which, it appears, you do not), you should find a doctor you trust.
1653137261655.png
 

psimp

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 1, 2009
Messages
314
Reaction score
135
Location
OKC
I’d PROBABLY allow it, if they’d make duplicate audio files, so I could also have one if ever needed. “But Doc, for 5 years I’ve been complaining/asking about this pain, lump, etc….” and you’ve always told me not a big deal, don’t worry”… now it’s too late.. Just saying it could work to one’s advantage, IF YOU GET A DUPE copy. But power to you, for voicing your opinion. 👍
 

psimp

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 1, 2009
Messages
314
Reaction score
135
Location
OKC
Ding ding ding........ it is called loss control. I'll betcha this was instigated by their med/mal insurance carrier.
Agree, but can work both ways. You’re supposed to have access to your records, but sometimes things get “misplaced” - I’ve recorded a couple Doc appointments for my wife, mainly to remember WTH they said. But also you can replay to Doc, when they change their prognosis/diagnosis and deny..
 

trekrok

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
1,753
Reaction score
2,367
Location
Yukon, OK
Ding ding ding........ it is called loss control. I'll betcha this was instigated by their med/mal insurance carrier.
This is along the lines I thought, but the other way. I was surprised that they would want to document by recording due to creating evidence that could be used against them.
 

JD8

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 13, 2005
Messages
27,888
Reaction score
25,938
Location
Tulsa
So one thing to consider, either way you feel about this, is that cyber crimes are a HUGE problem right now. Doctor's offices being a top target, this is just another exposure. I get why they want to do it though.
 

JD8

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 13, 2005
Messages
27,888
Reaction score
25,938
Location
Tulsa
This is along the lines I thought, but the other way. I was surprised that they would want to document by recording due to creating evidence that could be used against them.

It's like cameras in semi trucks now. If it's your fault, you settle quickly, if it's not, you provide the video and they settle quicker. Keeps attorneys costs down, which is a huge chunk of claims. So overall it generally saves insurance companies money.
 

NationalMatch

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Aug 21, 2021
Messages
377
Reaction score
755
Location
Oklahoma
they want to record the visit for risk management reasons (lawyers) instead of saving them a step In documentation.
No. If someone's going to sue, they sue. If a doctor is incompetent, a recording isn't going to absolve him.

It's just about saving time so the provider can leave at a decent hour.

But, if you're that opposed to it, pull out your phone and say, "I'll let you record me if you let me record you." Because of Hipaa, they'll likely rescind the request.
 

okcBob

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
May 17, 2020
Messages
2,738
Reaction score
2,991
Location
okc
Doc turnover at Integris is high especially Family Practice. Constantly changing computer and documentation systems, requirements for this and that and once it's finally learned and everyone is proficient at it they change again. I've had to change docs 4 times in the last 3 years due to him/her leaving or changing to another system.
How true. I guarantee every single clinical provider who gets the dreaded email notice of …“computer update with documentation changes will be effective in 2 weeks, please go to the education site to become familiar with the new documentation changes”… gets pissed off, every single time. The new software changes always seem to help with reports & billing, but never seem to make it easier for clinical staff (who actually do the work) & the usual administrationclaims of “ this will make your documentation quicker & seamless , etc” is laughable & patronizing to the clinical staff. I’ve been documenting in the clinical record since the 70’s when we still used paper charts. It’s still not any faster for the clinical staff. The only advantage I can see is that it’s quicker to access old records. If I need to look at past X-rays or old admissions, that’s when it helps, a lot. But the day to day charting is still tedious for clinical folks.
 
Last edited:

HFS

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Sep 8, 2009
Messages
2,165
Reaction score
2,112
Location
Shangri-La
Hmmm. Two things cross my mind about this.
First, there is a medical organization (not 100 percent sure but I *think* it was the Saintly one -- and do not ask me the location, can't remember) but they had signs at the entrance that specifically said no recording allowed inside.
Second, if I were inclined to let anybody else be recording you're damned right I'd want to be recording too. LAPD chief Daryl Gates in his later years supposedly brought TWO of his own tape recorders to any interview because he was tired of being misquoted.
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom