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Question...

Aries

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Yep they are called Lee Loaders.
https://leeprecision.com/lee-loader-9mm-luger.html

I started with 30-30 then 30-06 and then .308 with those Lee Loaders.
Wack-A-Mole loader.
You can make very accurate ammo with them.
Only down side for the rifle cases is they Neck size only.

If you got brass that was fired from a large chamber gun you may discover it will not fit your gun after sizing.
Been there done that.
I graduated from those to the Lee Cast iron classic press and Lee dies.
HA! I don't know how I missed that...

So on Lee's site, that is about $40, and the cheapest Lee single stage press is about $60. Can you still get a die set for about $30?

But if he already has the Lee Loader, then that's not a factor.

If that's the case, components are high but ammo is also high. You can probably save a little money, the question is whether it's enough to be worth the effort.
 

O4L

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The one thing you’re missing is the short term cost of the needed equipment. When loading smaller quantities of plinking ammo you end up having a higher cost per round due to the cost of the equipment needed. It takes longer to start seeing savings. But in the long term, it evens out. For example, if you spent $500 for your equipment, you have to factor that cost into your proposed savings. If you divide it up by 1000 rounds your first year at maybe $.30 per round, you’re adding $.50 per round to cover your equipment costs. So each round is actually costing you $.80. But the next 1000 round is gonna be $.30 and you actually start seeing savings. That cost goes even lower in the future hopefully, as you should be able to one day buy components for even cheaper.

In my opinion there is no downside if you can afford startup costs. You get a cool new hobby that can save you money in the long run.
I'm not missing the cost of equipment. I mentioned the up front costs.

In general...

Some of you guys act like you have to have an accounting degree to do the math and be a rocket surgeon to be able to reload.

Seems I remember that in the past many here would encourage others to get into reloading. It must have been on a different forum.

I just don't get it. Has reloading become some type of special elite super shooters club that I obviously don't meet the standards to join? [emoji2]
 

HoLeChit

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I'm not missing the cost of equipment. I mentioned the up front costs.

In general...

Some of you guys act like you have to have an accounting degree to do the math and be a rocket surgeon to be able to reload.

Seems I remember that in the past many here would encourage others to get into reloading. It must have been on a different forum.

I just don't get it. Has reloading become some type of special elite super shooters club that I obviously don't meet the standards to join? [emoji2]

you did mention up front cost, my bad.
It seems relatively simple to me. Read a half dozen internet articles, the instruction pages of your reloading book, and follow the rules. Maybe throw in a YouTube video or two. That’s my plan, as I haven’t started yet. I figure I’ll harass @swampratt into showing me how it’s done sometime soon.
I think the more of us reload, the better off we would be as a community. A few buddies of mine are accumulating odds and ends so we can make reloading mutually beneficial even.
 

O4L

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I started out thinking about getting a basic Lee loader but the Lee Breech Hand loader looks like a better option for me.

I don't have much room and nowhere to clamp down a press so that's why I'm not really looking to get a single stage press unless I can find one very cheap to make it worthwhile to come up with something that will take up space that I really don't have room for. [emoji5]
 

O4L

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This is what I thought he was talking about, the little Lee kits that were basically dies, you didn't need a press, you just tapped the cases into and out of the dies with a mallet. Does Lee even still make those? I couldn't find it on leeprecision.com

My earlier response was that they were painfully tedious to use, and the money for a press and dies sounded a lot more reasonable after I tried to load a dozen or so cartridges that way. Especially as inexpensive as Lee products are.

But yeah, as several above have said, it's the cost of the equipment. You can buy a Lee set that will have a lot of what you need for $150 bucks or so, but you'll want a few other accessories, and if you're only going to load 500 to 1000 rounds that couple of hundred bucks will eat up your savings.

I live in Sapulpa, but if it's worth your drive here you can use my equipment. I won't load it for you, but I'll show you how and supervise to try and make sure you don't blow yourself up. I'll even go in the house and get you some coffee or diet dr. pepper if you want, it'll be fun! :rollingla

Thanks for the offer but I rarely if ever get up that way. If I change my mind I'll let you know.

HA! I don't know how I missed that...

So on Lee's site, that is about $40, and the cheapest Lee single stage press is about $60. Can you still get a die set for about $30?

But if he already has the Lee Loader, then that's not a factor.

If that's the case, components are high but ammo is also high. You can probably save a little money, the question is whether it's enough to be worth the effort.

If I could get a single stage and die set for under $100 I would probably give it a try but I haven't been finding those kind of prices.
 

Aries

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If I could get a single stage and die set for under $100 I would probably give it a try but I haven't been finding those kind of prices.
That will be a little tight, but not impossible. Watch the "Pay it Forward" thread, one might show up there someday. Also used equipment turns up occasionally on ebay, and the prices on Lee's website are exaggerated, you can probably find their equipment for sale other places for less. Titan Reloading shows $42 for the little C press and a little over $30 for dies, but the press at least is out of stock.
 

Blwnup03

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Thanks for the offer but I rarely if ever get up that way. If I change my mind I'll let you know.

If I could get a single stage and die set for under $100 I would probably give it a try but I haven't been finding those kind of prices.

In my quest for parts, I have acquired a few rusty single stage presses. Need some TLC, you can have one.
 

O4L

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In my quest for parts, I have acquired a few rusty single stage presses. Need some TLC, you can have one.
Wow that would be great. Thanks!

I'll be in OKC Tuesday for the tour at 17Designs and over to SSP to pick up my lowers if that would be a good day to meet up.
 
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HFS

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Sir, step away from the toolbox!
This is what I thought he was talking about, the little Lee kits that were basically dies, you didn't need a press, you just tapped the cases into and out of the dies with a mallet. Does Lee even still make those? I couldn't find it on leeprecision.com

My earlier response was that they were painfully tedious to use, and the money for a press and dies sounded a lot more reasonable after I tried to load a dozen or so cartridges that way. Especially as inexpensive as Lee products are.

But yeah, as several above have said, it's the cost of the equipment. You can buy a Lee set that will have a lot of what you need for $150 bucks or so, but you'll want a few other accessories, and if you're only going to load 500 to 1000 rounds that couple of hundred bucks will eat up your savings.

I live in Sapulpa, but if it's worth your drive here you can use my equipment. I won't load it for you, but I'll show you how and supervise to try and make sure you don't blow yourself up. I'll even go in the house and get you some coffee or diet dr. pepper if you want, it'll be fun! :rollingla
"It's the cost of the equipment" is right.
The last time I looked was before the Pandemic and Lee still offered those "whale on it with a mallet" kits in a few common calibers.
The Lee kits in calibers no longer offered (out of production) were priced like solid gold on Gunbroker even then.
Does Lee still offer their hand press, not bench mounted, that takes one die at a time? That looks slow as the dickens to use.
 

HFS

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Sir, step away from the toolbox!
Also don't know if anybody has mentioned it but I think the Lee Loader kit only neck sizes rifle cases (not sure for handgun).
Some have reported that cases fired in one rifle and reloaded with the Lee Loader wouldn't chamber in another rifle of the same caliber. Don't know for a fact though.
 
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