Reloading.... Where To Start?

Matt Giroux

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
736
Reaction score
1,104
Location
Yukon
I started myself out on an old rock chucker single stage from the 80s that was passed down to me about 3-4 years ago, and for someone coming in as green as can be it was very good and easy to use, 1 thing I would recommend is an electronic scale for powder measurement. Doesn't have to be anything fancy. Hornady makes one that is like 30-$40 and it has worked well for me. I load mostly straight wall pistol cartridges with the occasional custom 308 load for my deer rifle. I would advise you start with 9mm, 38 spc, 357, something lower pressure and straight wall to get your feet wet and learn. The trimming down to spec and working with necked cartridges such as 308 and 556 took me awhile to get used to and become proficient at.

THE BIGGEST thing to remember is take it slow and don't get discouraged, I'm sure others can agree but I can tell you out of the first 500 or so rounds I loaded I had to make corrections in one form or another, go back to my notes and review my load data for that specific 50 rounds then tweak it here and there (Powder Charge, Seating Depth, etc) before I finally found that sweet spot for my gun.
 

Matt Giroux

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
736
Reaction score
1,104
Location
Yukon
Been thinking about grabbing a RCBS single kit to learn on and have something "firearm" related to do during the week. If I could do like 100 rounds in an evening a few days a week that'd handle my shooting, lol.
What I do is prep and clean all my brass then while I'm sitting on the couch watching tv I'll grab a box of Primers and prime out a couple hundred cases and put them in 100 round boxes so that way anytime I've got a free evening i can go out and crank out 100 or so rounds and always have primed cases
 

dlbleak

Sharpshooter
Staff Member
Supporting Member
Special Hen Administrator Moderator Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
Messages
16,600
Reaction score
13,661
Location
edmond
Good points by @Matt Giroux. I do my priming with a hand primer at the coffee table with a towel on it. I might have 2-300 cases ready in an ammo can when I can go to the bench and start charging rounds.
Matt mentioned notes. Get a notebook and jot down everything.
 

Matt Giroux

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2020
Messages
736
Reaction score
1,104
Location
Yukon
Good points by @Matt Giroux. I do my priming with a hand primer at the coffee table with a towel on it. I might have 2-300 cases ready in an ammo can when I can go to the bench and start charging rounds.
Matt mentioned notes. Get a notebook and jot down everything.
Yep, good ol trusty RCBS hand primer, and yes the notes, take notes of EVERYTHING specific to that load, oh and one last thing go to harbor freight (or any hardware store) and get a pair of good digital calipers. Competition dies are good but those calipers will put you within a thousandth of an inch on your seating and case trimming.
 

Aries

Sharpshooter
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
4,689
Reaction score
6,544
Location
Sapulpa
Here are some prices for various kits... I am not including the RCBS Rock Chucker kit since it's linked above, but the Rock Chucker is an excellent single stage press, and you'll never really need a better one. Any of the presses in the kits below can be bought without the kit, but you'll need everything in the kit and they will save a considerable amount of money compared to buying each part individually. If you don't like Amazon, they are all available other places.

I like to say the Lee equipment will last you a lifetime... RCBS, Hormady, Lyman will all last you several lifetimes.


I'm pretty sure this one could be used as a single stage, then you have a turret when you're ready to crank up production a bit.


Titan Reloading carries all the Lee products at reasonable prices.... FS Reloading



You'll probably want to add a scale to this kit

If you decide to go with a turret press, pay attention... some of them automatically move your brass to the next station, some require that you manually advance from station to station. If you have to manually advance, I personally don't see much advantage except that you don't have to change dies between operations.

You might also check ebay.... there might be some good deals on used presses, but your savings will likely get eaten up adding accessories. But it's really, really hard to wear out or damage a good quality press.

I noticed you are in Broken Arrow... I'm in Sapulpa and would be glad to have a session or two with you to get you started.
 

indi

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Aug 14, 2012
Messages
1,670
Reaction score
257
Location
Claremore

allmac

Marksman
Supporting Member
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jun 6, 2016
Messages
22
Reaction score
26
Location
Tulsa
My first press was a Dillon XL650. I bought it 7 years ago and I'm still using it today. I'm glad that I started with a more advanced press. I shoot between 5K and 12K rounds a year and there's no way I would want to devote the time it would take to load that much ammo on a single stage press. The XL650 also let's me leave my dies set-up while switching calibers (quick change tool heads), which is another huge time saver.

The Dillon also has a station just to verify the powder charge. I REALLY like the extra layer of safety of having each charge volume checked electronically.

Dillon warranty is second to none. Their presses are spendy, but if it breaks they'll send you parts for free. I've used the warranty several times and they've always been great.

Above all, be sure to do your homework. Get some help from someone who's experienced if you can. Be cautious. Check your work often. Verify your load data and your measurements. Keep a clean reloading bench.

Hope your reloading journey is as rewarding as mine has been.

Cheers
 

NikatKimber

Sharpshooter
Staff Member
Special Hen Moderator
Joined
Jan 2, 2006
Messages
20,637
Reaction score
1,300
Location
Claremore
Where should one start to learn how and begin reloading their own ammo?

I know very little, but am at a point where I can pull the trigger and start buying equipment to get started.

What press is a good beginner press? Do I buy a single stage, super simple press and set up just for 1 caliber to teach myself on? Or do I just go ahead and buy a multiple stage press (buy once cry once) and learn on it?

Ammo I would primarily reload is 9mm, 45, .223, .308 and Im sure a few other rifle calibers that Im not thinking of.......
Check this out. Links and prices probably outdated but the content should be good.

 

Latest posts

Top Bottom