Tractor time.

dennishoddy

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I guess the other reason I wouldn't want to use antifreeze is if it leaks because it's so toxic.
Just add weight to the rear end. If you don't have a tiller or other attachment, build a three point weight bar that you can add tractor weights to. I can provide a pic tomorrow if you want.
I find them at farm auctions pretty cheap. Probably have a thousand pounds of different weights designed to go over a bar with a slot in them.
Also have an angle iron bar mounted to the front loader with three chain hooks welded to it.
Great for hooking up loads and the bar is a great place to hang those weights to push T-posts in without having to use a manual post driver.
 

SoonerP226

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Just add weight to the rear end.
A friend of my dad's is mad at John Deere over that--they denied a warranty claim on his tractor because he didn't add weights on the rear. I don't recall what, specifically, broke, but it had something to do with the front axle part of the 4WD system.
 

dennishoddy

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A friend of my dad's is mad at John Deere over that--they denied a warranty claim on his tractor because he didn't add weights on the rear. I don't recall what, specifically, broke, but it had something to do with the front axle part of the 4WD system.
That doesn't make sense. Less weight on the front axle would reduce the torque the front axle would have to produce resulting in the front end having less work? I'd fight this stupidity.
 

SoonerP226

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That doesn't make sense. Less weight on the front axle would reduce the torque the front axle would have to produce resulting in the front end having less work? I'd fight this stupidity.
I don't know the details (and this was a couple of years ago), just that he was mad about it. I could make a potential argument from their side, but I'd just be guessing.
 

SlugSlinger

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Anti-freeze actually has anti-corrosion additives to help protect your engine. Mix it 50/50 with water and you shouldn't have any problems in tires either.
Use distilled water. Tap water has sediment that is corrosive.
Edit:
Also, new antifreeze will become acidic over time in an engine cooling system. I’m not sure, but I believe the process is related to electrolysis. I don’t know if the same thing would happen in a tire when an electrical current is not applied.
 
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OK Corgi Rancher

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Just add weight to the rear end. If you don't have a tiller or other attachment, build a three point weight bar that you can add tractor weights to.

I usually just keep my box blade attached if I'm using the loader for heavy work. It's not a lot of ballast but it's something. I also have another attachment that has the ability to accept weights.

I keep looking for something on CraigsList or elsewhere but haven't seen anything close enough to go get just yet.
 

geezer77

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I have a 2010 JD 3020E with a JD 305 loader and JD's rear aux hydraulics kit installed. Among other uses I maintain a 1/4 mile gravel access road with it, so I keep a very heavy duty 66" box blade on the back with a top & tilt 3-pt hitch. The loader bucket has a small grapple or "thumb" for picking up logs, brush, stumps, etc., very useful and a real backsaver for old folks like me. I had an ag tire dealer put calcium chloride put in the rears. The loaded tires plus the box blade hanging on back have kept the front end on the ground so far no matter what I was trying to do. I'll admit I have wished for more Wheaties in the front lift capability a few times, but I can generally pick up anything to around 1100 lb. Recently I had to install new pads under a not-quite-empty 250 Gal LP tank, and the little tractor couldn't quite pick up the whole tank, had to lift it one end at a time. Might have swapped the bucket for forks and gained enough to do it, but it was one of those recent triple digit afternoons and I didn't want to take the time. As for calcium chloride, the only concern I have it does eventually seem to corrode valve stems, so those should probably be changed out every few years. After 12 years, mine are definitely due.
 

old John

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There are many, many ways to get hurt on a tractor! I've used one most of my life, but wouild have never thought of what almost happened to me! Years ago I bought some bundles of slabs for kindling, from a saw mill. These things are just random lengths, and are bundled with a couple of metal straps to hold them togather. I was unloading one of these bundles, some of these slabs were 12/14 feet wide, and I had it chained to a loader bucket. The ends were bouncing around, as I hauled them to an area to be cut up into kindling. One extra long slab, that had a thin place on it, broke off, the end stuck into the ground, and the other end fell right towards my chest!!!! I managed to take my arm, and knock it aside a split second before it would have impeled my chest, before I could stop the tractor! When I got stopped, this slab that was kinds sharp pointed was 3 or 4 feet behind me under my right arm! Needless to say I had go go to the house and change my pants, and underwear! Of all the things that could happen, I would have never thought of this!
 

Timmy59

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A friend of my dad's is mad at John Deere over that--they denied a warranty claim on his tractor because he didn't add weights on the rear. I don't recall what, specifically, broke, but it had something to do with the front axle part of the 4WD system.
If I'm not mistaken the E series have an aluminum rear axle case. Which means no backhoe attachment.
 

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