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What's a good self defense gun for Grizzlies?

edl

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I read where they did research that showed that bear pepper spray (large volume, long distance) is better than a gun for repelling grizzlies. Not sure if it was "good" research, but done none the same.
 

progun40

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A Hoyt longbow with buzzcut broadheads and wackmaster arrows with dynamite taped to them. Always try and stay within 100yrds of the General lee for a fast getaway.
 

chief119

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Also found this in an article about bears pepper spray and such:
I have heard that bear spray actually attracts bears? Who would want to use something that does that?

A: I published a paper in 1998 in the Wildlife Society Bulletin (Vol. 26: 92-94) demonstrating that some Alaskan brown bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) were attracted to bear pepper spray residues. I decided to conduct this work after I’d observed a bear vigorously rolling in pepper spray residues put down by a person who had hoped that the spray would repel bears from his floatplane tied to the beach. It hadn’t worked and his neoprene float covers were damaged. Now here I was watching a bear vigorously scent rub in the orangish stain on the beach. “What if this stuff actually attracted bears?” I began to worry, but not whether or not the spray worked as a bear deterrent but rather regarding their interest in residues on objects regardless of how they got there. I reflected on the fact that only days before I had shown a new field assistant how to use pepper spray... by discharging it just outside my field camp perimeter. It never occurred to me that the residue might prove troublesome. What if this residue actually attracted bears? Considering this further, I knew of people who had applied pepper spray to objects in the hopes of repelling bears from them. I even knew of a PhD bear research scientist who lectured on bear safety and had suggested that spray could be used in this manner to protect items that couldn’t be otherwise protected from curious bears. I felt I needed to further investigate because property and people could possibly be injured by this misuse of the product.

For this research I sprayed red pepper spray directly onto the ground then sat back and observed bears' reactions to it. Many bears were clearly attracted to spray residues, some vigorously head rubbing, back rolling, pawing and eating the soils tainted with spray. I also observed some bears responding to these sites for up to a 5 days after spray application. So not only were they attracted to it but for some time after it had been dispensed. So I published a short note hoping to warn others of the potential dangers associated with misuse of the product.

Some persons have concluded that because pepper spray was shown to elicit and hold a bear’s interest is ought not be used as a deterrent. Does this make any sense? Of course not. All it means is that these sprays should only be used as intended by their manufacturers: directly into the face of an aggressive bear. Other uses, such as applying it to objects in the hopes that the spray might have some sort of repellent effect would be an outright waste of the product, and given my findings, potentially dangerous. Even after noting that some red pepper spray deterrents have this attractive quality about them, I never questioned their use or effectiveness. I carry theses products in bear country, my field assistants carry them and they are effective.

Link:http://www.absc.usgs.gov/research/brownbears/pepperspray/pepperspray.htm

Reading the thread, then looking for this attached pic, then reading this article. To paraphrase an old airline joke, Look Hikers with pepper spray, the meal that seasons itself.

As fer the actual weapon, I would use a S&W 29, with full 300 grain loads. Mainly for the power, and the fact, that I can hit a target consistently with it. I do like the idea of the trapper gun. I can also be pretty fast with a lever action rifle when needed.
 

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bankbb1

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First, I have been going into the wilderness for the better part of 40 years now and I have never had any problem with a grizzly or any other bear, even though I have been in very close proximity to them. As matter of fact the only animal I have ever had a problem with in the wilderness is man. Having said that, I would have to hold with a few of the others. What will you carry and what will you shoot? I only mean that a 454 Casul does little good against a pesky rabbit, much less a grizzly if you don't practice with it; it has the recoil of a howitzer and costs a fortune everytime you pull the trigger. On the other hand a .300 Weatherby magnum is of little use if its still in the house. Be willing to make a few decissions about what you are willing to be good with first. My opinion the gun.......if you want it for self defense, 12 ga. If your going hunting, get a big freakin' rifle.
 

WNM

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a revolver in .460 gives you plenty of power for bears, with the flexibility of being able to shoot .454 and .45 colt. Without the .500's vicious recoil so I've heard. this one would do the trick...http://gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=114109188

Beat me to it. Although I did shoot a friend of mine's super redhawk in .460 The recoil, while I'm sure is not as bad as a .500, is still no light snack.
 

sanjuro893

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A friend of mine who lived in AK for awhile always carried a pump 12 ga. with a pistol grip loaded with slugs. (When he was out in the wilderness, anyway.) He was always worried about bears, had the little sleigh bells on his walking stick and such. Anyhoo... he never ran across a bear, but ended up on top of a picnic table with a stick fending off a badger or a wolverine or something while his shotgun laid in his tent. After that he carried a .44 single action Ruger and ditched the shotgun. Not sure of the model, but he always swore by it.
 

mons meg

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I have heard of some folks using AR platforms in those crazy big calibers like .458 SOCOM...while out hiking. But anyway, like someobody way long ago said...my avatar would work best, if a little inconvenient to take along the trail without a team of Belgian draft horses...
 

hangarbum

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i spent about the last 3 years in anchorage and carried a super redhawk in .454 cassull for that purpose. the long bbl kicks like a mule, so i don't really want to think what a snubby would feel like.

also, alaska law allows open or concealed carry from any citizen, except felons and addicts or whatever else might disqualify someone, without any special permits. they used to have a permit, but dropped the requirement a couple of years ago.

congratulations on the move, i loved it there and may be heading back soon.
 
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