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Wonder why it takes so long.......

Discussion in 'NFA & Class III Discussion' started by CAR-AR-M16, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. BigDiezel

    BigDiezel Sharpshooter

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    Why wait biggsly? Send it now and get it in the summer!!!
     
  2. OKCShooter

    OKCShooter Sharpshooter

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    Fixed it for ya.
     
  3. Fyrtwuck

    Fyrtwuck Sharpshooter

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    If it were up to me, the whole process could be done just like they do a NICS check in a few minutes.

    I see no reason at all to have special forms, fingerprint cards, compliance certificates, CLEO signatures, photographs or the $200.00 stamp.

    I really think that if the government had it's way, ALL firearms would require this type of control.
     
  4. flatwins

    flatwins Sharpshooter

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    Yep, that the reason I won't do NFA.
     
  5. CAR-AR-M16

    CAR-AR-M16 Sharpshooter

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    I see your point and I agree that they should not be restricted like they are, but the fact that the government puts these restrictions in place to keep me from getting them makes me want them even more. If you don't get any NFA items you are doing exactly what they want and I for one refuse to do that. I will not let them stop me from enjoying the weapons I like.
     
  6. Fyrtwuck

    Fyrtwuck Sharpshooter

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    It doesn't stop me either. I have several and just sent off another Form-1 a few days ago. I just see no need for all that we have to go through. To me, it just comes back to control/restriction and money. they could care less if we got them or not. If they did, they'd hire more examiners and come up with a system to speed things up.
     
  7. AKguy1985

    AKguy1985 Sharpshooter

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    All they want is that $200. Once they get that they dont care.
     
  8. CAR-AR-M16

    CAR-AR-M16 Sharpshooter

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    True, but that $200 rate was set in 1934 which was a lot of money at the time and kept a lot of folks out of these weapons. If they ever adjust the rate for inflation (and I pray they never do) it would be over $3000 today.
     
  9. flatwins

    flatwins Sharpshooter

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    No kidding? They set the $200 price in 1934? Man, that was a truckload of money back then!
     
  10. CAR-AR-M16

    CAR-AR-M16 Sharpshooter

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    Yep, 1934. You can read some of the history of the act on the ATF's website: http://www.atf.gov/firearms/nfa/

    Pay particular attention to the part I have in highlighted in red.


    History of the National Firearms Act

    The NFA was originally enacted in 1934. Similar to the current NFA, the original Act imposed a tax on the making and transfer of firearms defined by the Act, as well as a special (occupational) tax on persons and entities engaged in the business of importing, manufacturing, and dealing in NFA firearms. The law also required the registration of all NFA firearms with the Secretary of the Treasury. Firearms subject to the 1934 Act included shotguns and rifles having barrels less than 18 inches in length, certain firearms described as “any other weapons,” machineguns, and firearm mufflers and silencers.

    While the NFA was enacted by Congress as an exercise of its authority to tax, the NFA had an underlying purpose unrelated to revenue collection. As the legislative history of the law discloses, its underlying purpose was to curtail, if not prohibit, transactions in NFA firearms. Congress found these firearms to pose a significant crime problem because of their frequent use in crime, particularly the gangland crimes of that era such as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. The $200 making and transfer taxes on most NFA firearms were considered quite severe and adequate to carry out Congress’ purpose to discourage or eliminate transactions in these firearms. The $200 tax has not changed since 1934.
     

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