Lumber over Time.

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Mr.Glock

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The home we just finished up was a 1959/60 build time. It did indeed have the 1-3/4 x 2-3/4 studs. We have rebuilt 2 different homes years ago that dated to early 1900s that had 2x4s that were actually 2x4s when built and over time had shrunk to 1-7/8 x 3-7/8. As well as the 2 homes in the early 1900s the wood was so hard there was no pulling nails or driving nails. Had to pre drill and use screws after stripping the lattice/plaster off the walls/ceilings and going back with sheet rock.





IMG_9497.jpeg
 

Big House

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The home we just finished up was a 1959/60 build time. It did indeed have the 1-3/4 x 2-3/4 studs. We have rebuilt 2 different homes years ago that dated to early 1900s that had 2x4s that were actually 2x4s when built and over time had shrunk to 1-7/8 x 3-7/8. As well as the 2 homes in the early 1900s the wood was so hard there was no pulling nails or driving nails. Had to pre drill and use screws after stripping the lattice/plaster off the walls/ceilings and going back with sheet rock.





View attachment 470598
Plywood was the same way.
 

RickN

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Get even older than that and it's not unusual for studs and support beams to be made of oak in some areas of the country. That's when you use nails configured like this:

cmh-01.jpg
I think a lot of those were made by the local blacksmith, not bought from a store.
 

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