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Suppressors for military

Discussion in 'NFA & Class III Discussion' started by ripnbst, Mar 2, 2015.

  1. ripnbst

    ripnbst Sharpshooter

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    I read an article on gundigest earlier:

    http://www.gundigest.com/article/inside-look-silencer-works?et_mid=727942&rid=247750387

    and noticed it said that hearing damage is the #1 reason that vets claim disability totaling over $2 million. My question, and maybe its a dumb one but it doesn't seem so to someone who hasn't been in the armed forces, why don't we equip all our military with silencers for their primary weapons? Sidearms I see no need for it as they are not shot as often and would make unholstering more of a task which could cost someone their life.
     
  2. Sanford

    Sanford Sharpshooter

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    Weight, heat, cleaning, reliability, repeatability ... probably others, but those are the ones I can think of off the top of my head.
     
  3. dennishoddy

    dennishoddy Sharpshooter

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    I can speak first hand here. Lost my hearing in the military in the early 70's.

    In some situations in different conflicts, the ability to swing the muzzle at close quarters in dense jungle would negate the advantage of saving your hearing vs saving your life.
    The can adds length. Length engages obstacles.

    In open country conflicts, I agree they could be used. IF they were readily removable with a quick detatch system. No fine thread unscrewing, no multiple safety BS things that some idiot would design into the system. One lever quick removal.

    Pistols, are typically deployed before entering into a building or hootch, so the can might not be a detriment if it were small enough.

    For the record, there are some very knowledgeable folks on here that are familiar with cans and how they are attached, etc. I'm lacking in that field. I'm just putting in my 2 cents about what the length of a can might or might not do in different situations.

    I shoot brakes in competitions so I know how nasty they can build up with residue. I can only imagine how a full auto after a couple thousand rounds a few hours during a fire fight might look like.
     
  4. ripnbst

    ripnbst Sharpshooter

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    I agree that length could be an issue but if it was known that a suppressor was to be attached we (the US military) could use shorter barrels, say 12.5" to make the effective overall length similar. I am no expert either. It just got me thinking and I know there are people on here with both experience in the service and suppressor experience. To me, a Joe Schmoe civilian, it seemed to make sense.

    Would the difference in reliability with a can vs without really be that significant? Bad enough to get back to Dennis' point of save your life or save your hearing? I know that the guns will get more dirty more quickly but the soldiers clean their weapons with some regularity AFAIK.
     
  5. SMS

    SMS Sharpshooter

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    Most military hearing loss is the combined effect of lots of things besides small arms fire. Machinery, vehicles, explosions etc....compounded over years of exposure, so silencers would only address part of the problem.

    Not a bad idea for other reasons though.
     
  6. HoLeChit

    HoLeChit Sharpshooter

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    I agree with this wholeheartedly.
    From personal experience, there is only a very small amount of time where small arms are fired without hearing protection, ie, in combat. In training we were required and checked for hearing protection. I feel that I suffered more hearing loss from doing my primary job, which was as a generator mechanic, and helping out our motor T and heavy equipment bubbas. Hearing protection was not available, and not even considered.
     
  7. HoLeChit

    HoLeChit Sharpshooter

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    I agree with this wholeheartedly.
    From personal experience, there is only a very small amount of time where small arms are fired without hearing protection, ie, in combat. In training we were required and checked for hearing protection. I feel that I suffered more hearing loss from doing my primary job, which was as a generator mechanic, and helping out our motor T and heavy equipment bubbas. Hearing protection was not available, and not even considered.
     
  8. dennishoddy

    dennishoddy Sharpshooter

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    Different conflicts/different MOS's had different exposures to small arms fire. The average infantry days in combat in my time was over two hundred days in a year tour.

    Mixed with small arms, heavy crew served guns, hand grenades, Arc Light missions, Artillery, Claymores, the minimal hearing protection provided was useless.

    Guys shredded cigarette butts to stuff in their ears. Modern technology has proven that is not sufficient to prevent hearing loss.
     
  9. Fyrtwuck

    Fyrtwuck Sharpshooter

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    The hearing loss I have is aircraft related. Having to work around aircraft, the flight line and the runways takes its toll after awhile.

    I have to disagree with this. If I were in a combat zone, I want every weapon option I can have. When I was in the military, I also made it a point to know what the other side was using and how to use it. I told my son before he went to the sandbox that if he wasn't issued a sidearm when he got there, let me know and I'd send him the money to get one. He protested a bit saying that it was against regulations. I told him, screw regulations, this is your life we're talking about. Luckily enough he was issued a Beretta when he got there.
     
  10. HoLeChit

    HoLeChit Sharpshooter

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    Different times, different jobs. Definitely sir.

    What what you have said, so very true.
     

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