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Sighting question, POI for different shooters?

Discussion in 'Shooting Chat' started by thaHooligan, Aug 20, 2019.

  1. thaHooligan

    thaHooligan Sharpshooter

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    The short question is, if I sight in a rifle, in a sled, should that rifles point of impact be the same for all other shooters? Or should it be adjusted to each individual shooter?

    I had a friend text me a couple weeks ago asking if he could bring a buddy over to my range so I could sight in a rifle for him. They came over this past weekend and there ended up being 2 guys with him, both needing their guns sighted in. I started with the first one, a T/C Compass in 6.5 cm with a 6-24x vortex hst. I went through my process as usual and the 3rd shot, at 100 yards, was maybe 1/2" from bullseye, I gave it those 2 clicks and called it good. The owner of the rifle shot and he was hitting about 1.5" right, so I adjusted it for him, done deal. Now on to the next gun, a Rem 770 30-06 with a no name, likely made in china, 3-9x scope. I warned them ahead of time that it may not be as consistent or accurate with its adjustments. There ended up being no problems with the sight in and it was within 1" of bullseye. So now the owner of this rifle is very new to shooting and this is the first rifle he has owned. He takes the seat and fires first shot and it's about 5 inches away from center, but I watched him yank that first trigger pull pretty hard. I talk to him about it and his next shots were better, but still several inches right, so I went ahead and adjusted it to where he was hitting. Also this guy was a left handed shooter if that matters.

    In my mind, when I sight a gun in a sled and it's hitting bullseyes, I feel like the bore and crosshairs are pretty true and in line with each other, but then if someone else shoots the gun and they cant hit the bullseye, is it because it's only sighted in for me and the way I shoot? or is it that they may need more practice?
     
  2. undeg01

    undeg01 Sharpshooter

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    It has been my experience that it varies, or can vary, from one person to the next, but it should be close. It all depends on your eye alignment. You can see the effects of that by shooting your own rifle that you know is on, simply by intentionally getting a higher or lower cheek weld than normal. Your POI will likely be off slightly from what you normally get with that same rifle.
     
  3. rswink

    rswink Sharpshooter

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    No, sighting is a very personal matter. I adjust my wife's rifles for her, that gets her close enough to dial in for her size and hold. I have also noted differences in my POI depending on how I am mounted to my weapon.... so

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
     
  4. DRC458

    DRC458 Sharpshooter

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    The person who's gonna' use it in the field needs to do the final sight-in. My hunting buddy's Dad (God rest his soul) was always coming to us, wanting us to sight in his rifles for him. We told him it wasn't gonna' work ... we could get it close, but he was gonna' have to make the final adjustments. And, he proved it, many times! Too many variables, cheek weld, trigger control, grip, sight picture, ...
     
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  5. Rod Snell

    Rod Snell Sharpshooter

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    It can be even worse for pistols. Had a very nice lady ask me to fix her Glock to hit POA vs a foot low at 7 yds. She had been practicing for months and got cup-sized groups at 7 yds------a foot low. After checking it out, I had her hold and sight the pistol while I pinched the trigger against the trigger guard. HIT DEAD CENTER. She had the most consistent flinch I've ever seen. Lots of careful practice doing it wrong.

    She finally stopped insisting it was the gun, and started learning.


    Personal differences are one thing, gross errors need work.
     
  6. thaHooligan

    thaHooligan Sharpshooter

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    ahh yea, I can see how different cheek welds could change the line of sight of the crosshairs for different shooters. After the first guy shot and we adjusted for him, he was hitting pretty good at 300 yards. The 2nd guy just needs a little more range time to tighten up his groups and to get more familiar with the rifle and shooting in general.
     
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  7. dlbleak

    dlbleak Moderator Staff Member

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    I’ve seen it many times. POI being inches off for different shooters
     
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  8. Jcann

    Jcann Sharpshooter

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    First off the lead sled doesn't mimic a shooters natural follow through, therefore groups can change once the shooter is using a bag or bipod. A consistent cheek weld is part of shooting to a consistent point of aim but with a properly set parallax on a scope the cross hairs shouldn't move with a different cheek weld. Other factors to look at include stock (shoulder pocket) placement, shooter body position (recoil will take the path of least resistance), breathing, rifle cant, and trigger squeeze. All these factors may cause sighted in rifles to shoot different POI for different shooters.
     
  9. dennishoddy

    dennishoddy Sharpshooter

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    Nailed it! The lead sled is a great way to get the POI close, then a natural rest with a shooters shoulder to zero.
     
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  10. Neckbeard

    Neckbeard Ammo For Sale

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    Agree with most everything that has been said. My son shoots all my rifles and routinely there is a 1-1.5 in difference between us at 100 yards off a rest, or bi-pod.
     

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