adding heat to the garage?

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THAT Gurl

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Years ago on an automotive forum we were discussing this topic. Someone suggested that you might want to avoid open flame heating sources if you're planning on working with things that tend to get explodey, like gasoline vapors--and if you have one and you're generating fine sawdust, you probably ought to invest in a dust collection system.

Can't say I've ever worked in a heated garage, so I've never tested that theory.

I had a classmate burn to death when I was in 6th, 7th grade -- best the fire chief could figure, he had a lit cigarette in his hand while he was pouring gasoline into a lawn mower. It was awful.
 

Biggsly

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The heater on my ceiling was cheap from Amazon and works great.
The propane heater is one of the best heaters I’ve ever had. It will warm the whole garage.
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ConstitutionCowboy

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With any fossil fuel burning heater there's a possibility of co poisoning, even residential and commercial natural gas dryers, ovens, hvac units and water heaters. The risk with that heater is no greater, but I would definitely have a co detector anywhere you use fossil fuel for energy.
Yeah, I thought so. I'll keep my electric unit if it takes the edge off the cold garage when it comes - supposedly tomorrow. If I have to go to a kerosene heater, I'll definitely get a CO detector as well.

Thanks!

Woody
 

TerryMiller

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Years ago on an automotive forum we were discussing this topic. Someone suggested that you might want to avoid open flame heating sources if you're planning on working with things that tend to get explodey, like gasoline vapors--and if you have one and you're generating fine sawdust, you probably ought to invest in a dust collection system.

Can't say I've ever worked in a heated garage, so I've never tested that theory.

That right there in bold letters. I used to work in agribusiness (both on the farm and managing a country grain elevator) and dust is HIGHLY explosive. We had to be extra cautious with moving grain around.

 

TerryMiller

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One other thing: How much will such a heater cause the cold garage doors, etc., to sweat?

Woody

I don't have pictures right now, but our son cut some kind of foam insulation panels to fit inside each of the panels of his garage door to help insulate the garage. I would think something like that would help keep down the sweating. (I would "think" that, but sometimes my "thinker" doesn't function right.)
 

ConstitutionCowboy

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I don't have pictures right now, but our son cut some kind of foam insulation panels to fit inside each of the panels of his garage door to help insulate the garage. I would think something like that would help keep down the sweating. (I would "think" that, but sometimes my "thinker" doesn't function right.)
My garage doors are "insulated", but it isn't all that great. I'd have to play it by ear, I guess. For now, though, the electric heater should be my best option.

I'll report how well or not so well it works.

Woody
 

Firemedic712

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One other thing: How much will such a heater cause the cold garage doors, etc., to sweat?

Woody
Usually the air is so dry with these artic systems there isn't enough moisture to condense against the cold walls. His garage is drywalled and insulated. The only glass is the exterior door. It will fog over a bit but no visible moisture or ice forms
 

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