Biden DOJ interfering in Arizona election audit

ConstitutionCowboy

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Under the court order, the Senate and Cyber Ninjas last week released their policies and procedures for the recount. Hobbs' elections director, Bo Dul, told The Associated Press there were major problems with those rules, including that they seemed haphazard, lacked specifics ,and left much room for interpretation — something that is never allowed in ballot counts.

Ehh ... Umm ... Does this not remind anyone of the "ballot interpretations" the Democrats engaged in when Gore lost in Florida? Hanging chads and all that falderal? I guess it's OK for them to interpret, though. And, those rules seemed haphazard, lacked specifics ,and left much room for interpretation, not that those rules were haphazard, lacked specifics ,and left much room for interpretation. Without proof, they are simply casting dispersions, falshoods, and baseless doubt. Obviously, they have something to hide. Obviously, they are preparing grounds to nullify any findings that expose them for what they are and what they have done.

Woody
 

SlugSlinger

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And more interference today.

Officials in Maricopa County, Arizona, are refusing to comply with subpoenas from the state Senate that require them to turn over routers or router images to auditors reviewing the November 2020 election, saying that surrendering the items will cause a "significant security risk" to local law enforcement.

"We had previously believed that the risk would be eliminated by redacting the law enforcement data on the routers and not producing it. But we were informed that redaction did not eliminate the risk," Deputy County Attorney Joseph LaRue said in a letter this week to Senate Audit Liaison Ken Bennett, reports The Arizona Daily Independent. "We also learned that if criminal elements or others gained access to this data, it might compromise county and federal law enforcement efforts and put the lives of law enforcement personnel at risk."

LaRue's letter was prompted after Bennett this week told KFYI, a local talk radio station in Phoenix, that the county's officials were not in compliance with the subpoenas, which were signed by Senate President Karen Fann and Senate Judiciary Chair Warren Petersen and ruled valid by a judge in February.

Trucks filled with the county's elections equipment, records, and almost 2.1 million original ballots were delivered to the Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Phoenix, where the audit started on April 23.

LaRue said county officials had been planning to provide the audit team with virtual images of the routers but weren't sure if it could "safely produce" the information without comprising the law enforcement agencies' security. He further said in his letter that the images could put citizens' Social Security information and other confidential data at risk.

He did not say when the routers may be handed over, but said he'll "follow up with you about this when I know more."


A county official told The Epoch Times that technology professors have determined that information contained in the routers "can be used as blueprints to intercept sensitive county data."

"Maricopa County has more than 50 different county departments, and the routers the Senate subpoena commanded the County produce support for all of these departments, not just elections operations," he said. "This includes critical law enforcement data that, by law, cannot be disclosed, as well as Maricopa County residents’ protected health information and full Social Security numbers. By providing the routers, or even virtual images of routers, sensitive data and the lives of law enforcement personnel could be endangered. The county is continuing to study this issue, and routers remain in the county’s custody for the time being."

Maricopa County officials said separately on Wednesday that two laboratories tested the voting equipment in February and found no evidence that election machines were connected to the Internet.

But Bennett told KFYI that auditors could not confirm that the machines weren't online unless they had access to the logs.

"Here we are several weeks into the audit, and we still don’t have some of the information that was subpoenaed by the state Senate from Maricopa County," he said, according to The Epoch Times.

"They told me personally weeks ago that they had taken all the routers and the internet connections and the hubs and everything out of the building so they could send it to us, and we would have the logs when we got into those devices, we would be able to see those logs, that nothing was connected to the Internet during the election," he said, "and lo and behold, they don’t show up in the equipment that they said would be delivered to us."
 

Glocktogo

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And more interference today.

Officials in Maricopa County, Arizona, are refusing to comply with subpoenas from the state Senate that require them to turn over routers or router images to auditors reviewing the November 2020 election, saying that surrendering the items will cause a "significant security risk" to local law enforcement.

"We had previously believed that the risk would be eliminated by redacting the law enforcement data on the routers and not producing it. But we were informed that redaction did not eliminate the risk," Deputy County Attorney Joseph LaRue said in a letter this week to Senate Audit Liaison Ken Bennett, reports The Arizona Daily Independent. "We also learned that if criminal elements or others gained access to this data, it might compromise county and federal law enforcement efforts and put the lives of law enforcement personnel at risk."

LaRue's letter was prompted after Bennett this week told KFYI, a local talk radio station in Phoenix, that the county's officials were not in compliance with the subpoenas, which were signed by Senate President Karen Fann and Senate Judiciary Chair Warren Petersen and ruled valid by a judge in February.

Trucks filled with the county's elections equipment, records, and almost 2.1 million original ballots were delivered to the Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Phoenix, where the audit started on April 23.

LaRue said county officials had been planning to provide the audit team with virtual images of the routers but weren't sure if it could "safely produce" the information without comprising the law enforcement agencies' security. He further said in his letter that the images could put citizens' Social Security information and other confidential data at risk.

He did not say when the routers may be handed over, but said he'll "follow up with you about this when I know more."


A county official told The Epoch Times that technology professors have determined that information contained in the routers "can be used as blueprints to intercept sensitive county data."

"Maricopa County has more than 50 different county departments, and the routers the Senate subpoena commanded the County produce support for all of these departments, not just elections operations," he said. "This includes critical law enforcement data that, by law, cannot be disclosed, as well as Maricopa County residents’ protected health information and full Social Security numbers. By providing the routers, or even virtual images of routers, sensitive data and the lives of law enforcement personnel could be endangered. The county is continuing to study this issue, and routers remain in the county’s custody for the time being."

Maricopa County officials said separately on Wednesday that two laboratories tested the voting equipment in February and found no evidence that election machines were connected to the Internet.

But Bennett told KFYI that auditors could not confirm that the machines weren't online unless they had access to the logs.

"Here we are several weeks into the audit, and we still don’t have some of the information that was subpoenaed by the state Senate from Maricopa County," he said, according to The Epoch Times.

"They told me personally weeks ago that they had taken all the routers and the internet connections and the hubs and everything out of the building so they could send it to us, and we would have the logs when we got into those devices, we would be able to see those logs, that nothing was connected to the Internet during the election," he said, "and lo and behold, they don’t show up in the equipment that they said would be delivered to us."

Last I read, complying with a lawfully executed subpoena, wasn't optional. :anyone:
 

SlugSlinger

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There’s a developing story out of Maricopa County, Arizona where “serious issues” have been discovered during the ballot audit. In a letter sent Wednesday, state Senate President Karen Fann asked the Board of Supervisors to explain several irregularities uncovered during the early stages of the audit.

Fann wrote the first issue is with regards to “Maricopa County’s apparent intent to renege on its previous commitment to comply fully with the legislative subpoenas.” She went on to say the chain of custody of the ballots has been insufficiently recorded, resulting in “apparent omissions, inconsistencies and anomalies.”

Most notably, however, was the recent discovery of several deleted databases from the Election Management System.


“We have recently discovered that the entire ‘Database’ directory from the D drive of the machine ‘EMSPrimary’ has been deleted,” Fann wrote, claiming the missing directory is covered by the Senate's subpoena, which allows the group to seize elections materials for the audit.

“This suggests that the main database for all election related data for the November 2020 General Election has been removed,” she added. “Can you please advise as to why these folders were deleted, and whether there are any backups that may contain the deleted folders?”

The audit team's Twitter account, which is run by unspecified volunteers, said the team's allegations point toward "spoliation of evidence" by county officials.

Fann requested Elections Department officials, and others privy to the matter, meet at the Arizona State Capitol on May 18 to address the EMS files along with other stated issues "without recourse to additional subpoenas or other compulsory process."

The meeting, if parties agree to it, would be livestreamed to the public.

Former President Donald Trump, who boasted unsubstantiated claims about widespread fraud in the 2020 election and has lauded the efforts by the Republican Senate-led audit to examine 2.1 million ballots cast in the county's election, released a statement on Thursday promoting Fann's letter.

"A devastating letter written by Arizona Senate President Karen Fann on voting irregularities, and probably fraud, in Maricopa County during the 2020 Presidential Election. Even the database was illegally deleted after the subpoena to produce the information," Trump said.

Other issues mentioned in Fann's letter include concerns that several boxes containing the ballots cast in the November election were allegedly turned over by the county without tamper-evident seals, or without the ballots being sealed in bags, as well as questions about the ballot batch counts.

“The audit team has encountered a significant number of instances in which there is a disparity between the actual number of ballots contained in a batch and the total denoted on the pink report slip accompanying the batch,” Fann wrote. “In most of these instances, the total on the pink report slip is greater than the number of ballots in the batch, although there are a few instances in which the total is lower.”

At the meeting, Senate leaders intend to discuss the county's admitted noncompliance with one of the items from the subpoena, reviewing virtual images of routers under the observation of the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office.

Fann has raised questions with Maricopa County officials' previous estimate that a router inspection would cost up to $6 million, saying it "seems odd," given the routers were disconnected from the county's network and prepared for delivery to the Senate before objections arose. She also offered to have technicians for CyFIR, a subcontractor for the Cyber Ninjas lead audit team, go into the Maricopa County facility to review the virtual images of the routers.

Maricopa County Attorney Allister Adel has argued that providing the county's routers "could jeopardize the security of law enforcement data," claims echoed by Democratic Sheriff Paul Penzone.

Ballot counting continued on the audit floor on Thursday before a brief weeklong pause as high school graduation ceremonies are set to be underway at the Veterans Memorial Coliseum, where the audit is taking place.

The Arizona Exposition and State Fair Board amended an agreement on Wednesday with the facility to allow the safe storage of election materials until May 23, also extending the lease at the Coliseum until June 30 to allow more time for ballot counting.

Both the Maricopa County Elections Department and Sellers also have not issued a public response to Fann's letter.
 

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