How do you train?

Chris Harrison

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I've been lurking on the boards for a while but just now starting to post. I'd like to tell you something about myself. Not to toot my own horn, but merely to point out that I have a particular perspective about defensive firearms training. Please take what I'm about to say knowing that I do so humbly. To start with I was my unit's marksmanship instructor for about 8 years, USAR. I shot competitively in local action pistol matches for 10 years. I have taken 13 defensive firearms courses over the years and I've lost count of how many rounds I've put downrange. I'm no spring chicken.
I taught a church security group for 4 months. We did range time twice a week for 2 hours each time, I've assisted in teaching numerous other classes. Good enough.

I find that a LOT of people who get a permit to carry concealed have only taken the state-required education. And that is true on all three states that I've possessed a permit for. Here in OK the guy that did the class, I was in finished with us in about 6 hours, a far cry from the required 16 the state says is the minimum. I wonder how many people got abbreviated classes.

Once I started training, the most important thing I learned, was how much I didn't know. And the more I learned the more I came to realize that there is no end. The journey, training and practice never ends.

How many training classes have you been to? Do you plan to go to additional training this year, (despite the high cost of ammo)? When you practice, do you practice with a purpose? If you have been to classes, what do you feel the most important thing you learned was?

I make no claims at being an expert or a professional. But I am a serious student and I'm pretty dedicated to training and practice. While my daughters are grown up and married with kids of their own I still have my wife that I am responsible for her safety as well as my own, and now we have visiting grandchildren. The world seems to be getting more and more crazy so I don't let up, don't slack off much on training and practice. My wife is reasonably accomplished with a handgun as are my daughters, but that makes no difference in what I view as my responsibilities for their safety.

I'd appreciate any feedback on the questions I've posed.
Thanks,
 

Snattlerake

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How much training is enough?
I remember one thing my instructors told me and it has come in handy many times.

You can only rise to the level you have been trained to.
Kris Tanto Paronto
 

El Pablo

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5 classes that I recall.

Most important skill for me, how to properly grip a handgun. The rest was kind of pointless when I didn't do that correctly.

Practice based off experience classes and uspsa shooting.
 

dennishoddy

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My formal training was in the Army, and Army reserves after that when shooting was still an important skill.
The last twenty years give or take a few years as I don't keep track has been involved in USPSA pistol matches and steel challenge matches using both pistol and rifle. Every weekend and sometimes on Saturday at one match and Sunday at another.
Fun times that expose strengths and weaknesses to be worked on. One learns proper grip, sight acquisition, clearing malfunctions quickly and on the fly problem solving.
My time at matches has gone down severely with the ammo shortage and current lifestyle of traveling, but do attend matches when possible, where we are located.
Edit: If I'm at the range by myself there is always a shot timer on my belt to signal a start and measure splits.
 

chuter

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For about 3 or 4 years I was kind of a training junkie, took probably a dozen classes, mostly pistol but a couple of rifle and a couple of shotgun too.
Except for the shoothouse class at Wilshire, it's been 4 or 5 years since I took any classes.
I don't shoot near as much as I did then, still work on my mental preparation.
 

chuter

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First shot accuracy is my weak point so I spend time on that, and transition between targets.
I seldom practice drawing from the holster with live rounds for safety reasons, so I practice the draw with dry fire. Work on my live round fist shot from the low ready. Depending on the range I also practice with the gun in position just out of the holster, pointing down range, so I can bring it up and press to target.
 

ricco

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Until we know the "why" we can't properly train/practice the "how".

First, let's be honest and call this what it is, it's "fighting". I get it, fighting isn't PC and gun people tend to shy away from the term as it casts a negative connatation. That being said, until we come to terms with "fighting" as opposed to being involved in a fun pastime that might also be a means to save our life we will continue to be bogged down in the "how"

Being a good shooter isn't the same as being a good fighter, it is like saying that being a good heavy bag puncher makes a good boxer, there is much more required. Being a good shooter is a part of being a good fighter but only a part, not the whole.

Becoming a good shooter is for the most part a fun pastime, becoming a good fighter is for the most part arduous.

While it might be fun to spend a weekend training like a SWAT team guy or a SEAL that type of training has little or nothing in common with what the CCW is likely to require should the need arise.

Before any training decide what you will and will not, as a CCW, become involved in and hard focus on that aspect.

For me, I am not a sheepdog, I will not run to the sound of gunfire. I am not one that will run to the rescue or stop the bad guy from doing bad things to things or people that I am not willing to risk having my life destroyed to save. To my way of thinking everyone is on their own. Unless it is a direct attack my mouth stays closed, my fists remain unclenched, the pepper spray remains in the pocket and pistol remains in the holster. I put no faith in "situational awarness", Cooper's "color code" or bogus "stand your ground" laws. I will always be behind the curve should an attack ever occur. My training/practice is a direct reflection of that thinking.
 
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