Mystery Mauser and 6mm Rem continued…

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swampratt

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Why engrave it?
You had so much fun with it.

What shape is the ejected brass?
Is it the same shoulder angle as what you stuck into it?
 

DRC458

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@PanhandleGlocker - I do believe you have a winner there! I would definitely hang onto it! A lot of gunsmiths have a stamp kit in their tool box and can easily stamp the caliber onto the barrel.

@swampratt - I think he just means to etch the caliber on the barrel so it is easily identified and nobody in the future is left wondering what caliber it is! That definitely needs to be done! I have some myself that need to be etched.
 

dennishoddy

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@PanhandleGlocker - I do believe you have a winner there! I would definitely hang onto it! A lot of gunsmiths have a stamp kit in their tool box and can easily stamp the caliber onto the barrel.

@swampratt - I think he just means to etch the caliber on the barrel so it is easily identified and nobody in the future is left wondering what caliber it is! That definitely needs to be done! I have some myself that need to be etched.
Agree 100%. I was at an estate auction years ago when a rifle came up for sale. It was definitely a Arisaka 7.7 action that had been sporterized. The only thing that was on the rifle for ID was a hang tag with .300 Savage on it.
measuring the bore at the muzzle, it was certainly the correct diameter but I was still hesitant as tags are easy to change, so got a box of shells, loaded one with the rifle on a rest on the other side of a pond dam and pulled the trigger with a string. (no glocks available for personal protection)
Measured the brass and sure enough it was .300 Savage, which has an interesting history as a onetime wildcat cartridge.
It has almost identical ballistics as a .308 and was in contention at one time with the .308 for military acceptance for their standard round. The .308 was developed specifically for this competition against a known cartridge and won. There was lots of grumbling about that decision for obvious reasons, but it is what it is. The .308 has proven itself.
Back to my rifle it must have been converted in the 80's or so as it sports a Bishop stock which was top of the line in that era. The owner did or had done some hand engraving that is pretty unique although it has some obvious flaws, along with some Mother of Pearl inlays that also date it to the 80's or late 70's.
I can't complain. Got it for $300 and it's a tack driver with the old Weaver wire scope it came with at 100 yards. The clarity of the glass leaves much to be desired. Amazing how far glass has come.
Several deer have fell in front of it.
I need to make some permanent markings on it so nobody down the road has to pull the trigger with a string.
 

AKguy1985

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Agree 100%. I was at an estate auction years ago when a rifle came up for sale. It was definitely a Arisaka 7.7 action that had been sporterized. The only thing that was on the rifle for ID was a hang tag with .300 Savage on it.
measuring the bore at the muzzle, it was certainly the correct diameter but I was still hesitant as tags are easy to change, so got a box of shells, loaded one with the rifle on a rest on the other side of a pond dam and pulled the trigger with a string. (no glocks available for personal protection)
Measured the brass and sure enough it was .300 Savage, which has an interesting history as a onetime wildcat cartridge.
It has almost identical ballistics as a .308 and was in contention at one time with the .308 for military acceptance for their standard round. The .308 was developed specifically for this competition against a known cartridge and won. There was lots of grumbling about that decision for obvious reasons, but it is what it is. The .308 has proven itself.
Back to my rifle it must have been converted in the 80's or so as it sports a Bishop stock which was top of the line in that era. The owner did or had done some hand engraving that is pretty unique although it has some obvious flaws, along with some Mother of Pearl inlays that also date it to the 80's or late 70's.
I can't complain. Got it for $300 and it's a tack driver with the old Weaver wire scope it came with at 100 yards. The clarity of the glass leaves much to be desired. Amazing how far glass has come.
Several deer have fell in front of it.
I need to make some permanent markings on it so nobody down the road has to pull the trigger with a string.
I had a type 99 arisaka that somebody had re-chambered to 30-06. It was not marked as such. Surprised me the first time I fired 7.7 out of it.
 

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