Paper shell Seedlings

Roy14

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If this post should be somewhere else please move it for me!

Saw this posted on FB, and was wondering if this was a good deal or if I needed to pass it up. I’d heard they needed to be grafted into a native, and a comment from another person on the post voiced my concerns. What do you guys know about this? I’ve got good bottom land that has several mature native pecans on it, and I lost a dozen or so in a bad wind storm last year. I’d like to replace those and add more to the grove, and eventually pick pecans off them. Thanks guys!
 

Neanderthal

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Those grown from seeds will not the be same as the parent tree. The papershell pecan aren't native, they will have been grafted. Therefore, the seed that planted will be the same as the original rootstock, not the same as the nut itself. If you are looking for papershell pecan specifically, I'd pass. However, if you don't care what comes up other than being pecan...go for it.
 

2busy

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I’d really like to get paper shell specifically. How do I go about doing that?

The fasted way to get papershell is to buy grafted trees. Atwoods usually has them in the spring. The best way according to my friend is to plant native pecan nuts and then graft to the rootstock with paper shell scion wood. He claims that by not having the tap root trimmed off , they root stock out grows ones that have been trimmed that nurseries sell.
 

magna19

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Saw this posted on FB, and was wondering if this was a good deal or if I needed to pass it up. I’d heard they needed to be grafted into a native, and a comment from another person on the post voiced my concerns. What do you guys know about this? I’ve got good bottom land that has several mature native pecans on it, and I lost a dozen or so in a bad wind storm last year. I’d like to replace those and add more to the grove, and eventually pick pecans off them. Thanks guys!
You should start/plant some native pecans from (you area or somewhat north of you). Then graft a chosen cultivar for your area growing season. The native (or more northern) rootstock will be much hardier for the long run dealing with all the things that like pecans also. (insects, scab, weather, etc.) Im no expert but the OSU fact sheets online will get you started.
 
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