1. Welcome to Oklahoma Shooters Association! Join today, registration is easy!

    You can register using your Google, Facebook, or Twitter account, just click here.

TEDx talk from a veteran in prison

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by chuter, Jul 11, 2019 at 8:58 AM.

  1. chuter

    chuter Sharpshooter

    Supporter
    Messages:
    1,835
    Likes Received:
    886
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Location:
    Piedmont, OK
    Rating
    100%
    I'm not a vet, so I can't relate like some of you will, but this made me tear up a bit.

     
    Snattlerake and jakeman like this.
  2. SMS

    SMS Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    13,060
    Likes Received:
    1,594
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2005
    Location:
    OKC area
    Rating
    100%
    Just emoting that experience was probably a huge leap in his rehabilitation and healing. The system sure failed a lot of people during the transition from military service to civilian life....
     
  3. rc508pir

    rc508pir Sharpshooter

    Supporter
    Messages:
    3,492
    Likes Received:
    2,387
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2015
    Location:
    Lawton, OK
    True.... But these guys are also failing because of their upbringing. Most men are guilty of it, and its instilled from a young age, you all have heard it before. Real men dont cry, real men dont talk about their problems, etc. Unfortunately, most of these guys go far too long, before opening up about their experiences and problems. That macho BS has gotta stop.
    And Im not saying that we as parents dont need to make our kids less tough. There's a big difference in telling your boy to man up and quit crying over a boo-boo as opposed to bottling up emotional scars from combat (which usually does resorting to the bottle or worse)
     
    Annie and SMS like this.
  4. John6185

    John6185 Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    3,263
    Likes Received:
    1,730
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2012
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    And if you are reluctant or hesitant to join: No Grunts Under 26, $250K Bonuses: DoD's Most Radical Ideas to Transform the Infantry. How's that? $250,000 as a bonus to sign up! I think they are having problems with the indignant youth entering the Army. Uncle Sam wants you! Yes you Chuter! You can make a difference!
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019 at 3:07 PM
    rc508pir likes this.
  5. chuter

    chuter Sharpshooter

    Supporter
    Messages:
    1,835
    Likes Received:
    886
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2010
    Location:
    Piedmont, OK
    Rating
    100%
    I don't see where the "Don't give up yet...." quote came from, but I'm 66, was classified 4F back in the Vietnam era.
     
  6. ignerntbend

    ignerntbend Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    12,638
    Likes Received:
    1,179
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Looks like they're considering that for special forces candidates who can get through the training. Not really the same thing as 250k "just to sign up". Thank god.
     
    Annie likes this.
  7. druryj

    druryj Super Moderator Staff Member

    Moderator Supporter
    Messages:
    15,552
    Likes Received:
    6,972
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2010
    Location:
    Yukon, OK
    Rating
    100%
    surjimmy likes this.
  8. dennishoddy

    dennishoddy Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    62,233
    Likes Received:
    15,406
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    Location:
    Ponca City Ok
    Rating
    100%
    The system has been failing for a long time. Suicides run about 20 a day or 8000 per year among veterans, mostly. There is no de-programming services available to release the veteran from what has been programmed into their 18 year old mushy minds for the most part.
    The VA does offer services and counseling if your willing to admit or show signs of PTSD, but if not, there is very little follow up unless you ask for it. If you do, there is substantial help to be gained.
    I gleaned this from what should be a fairly reputable source.

    This summer the Department of Veterans Affairs released its second VA National Suicide Data Report. This report, again representing a joint effort between the VA, analysts, and researchers, assesses suicide data from 2005 to 2015. Its predecessor, released in 2012, gave rise to the widely held belief that 22 veterans a day die by suicide. This report adjusts that figure by two, establishing a number closer to 20 a day--a number which has reportedly remained constant from 2008-2015. Moreover, the report states that this number also includes active duty service members, National Guard, and Reservists.

    This report farther breaks down that number into those using VA-provided care (six per day), Veterans not utilizing VA services (11 a day), and those currently on active duty, National Guard, and/or in the Reserves (four a day). Perhaps, most importantly, it contains information on ethnicity, era of service, and age group comparisons.

    The result is a refutation of the current belief that younger veterans, or those of the Global War on Terror generation (post-9/11 veterans), account for the bulk of veteran suicides. In fact, veterans who served during peacetime (i.e. the years between major conflicts) account for one-third of deaths by suicide in 2015.

    While rates of suicide were highest among younger veterans (ages 18–34) and lowest among older veterans (ages 55 and older), veterans ages 55 and older accounted for 58.1 percent of all veteran suicide deaths in 2015. [Suicide rate: A suicide rate divides the number of suicide deaths by the relevant population size for a period of time.]

    With veterans over the age of 50 accounting for 73 percent of the entire veteran population, it makes numerical sense they account for the majority of veteran death by suicides. From a phenomenological perspective it also fits, as the bulk of suicides in America are overwhelmingly middle-aged men.

    The higher suicide rate among younger service members and veterans (age 18-34) is concerning and harder to understand. A commonly used key demographic bracket (18-34) in research, the belief is that those that fall within that cohort share similar experiences or characteristics. However, for anyone that has spent time in the military, the experience of an 18 year old on his or her first tour of duty is vastly different from a 32 year old, non-commissioned officer, with multiple deployments who has transitioned out. Unfortunately, the report does not shed more light on where the burden is most significant in that population.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/...-releases-second-national-suicide-data-report
     
  9. John6185

    John6185 Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    3,263
    Likes Received:
    1,730
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2012
    Location:
    Oklahoma City
    Since we're not he subject and you asked for my opinion, here goes :>). They need to bring back the draft because then they would have a cross-section of all members of society and out of that mix would come some mighty fine officers and enlisted. At present, we get a lot of people who don't want to work at McDonalds. Moreover, it would give the youth a sense of direction, a skill, teach them to respect authority and follow instructions/rules, provide them with some outstanding training that would last their entire lives as well as some lifelong friends. Most importantly, they would grow up and accept the responsibility given them. It most likely would cut down on crime, child abandonment, welfare and a myriad of other social programs that give to those who don't work.
    The draft gave us General's Eisenhower, Omar Bradley, Patton, Billy Mitchell, Curtis LeMay Sgt York, Audie Murphy (I know he joined vs drafted) and a host of other good men but suffice it to say had it not been for the draft a lot of good men would not have served their country nor have been noticed-they would perhaps been CEO's of some of our corporations. Disclaimer: You didn't ask for my opinion and I am not responsible.
     
    ignerntbend likes this.
  10. ignerntbend

    ignerntbend Sharpshooter

    Messages:
    12,638
    Likes Received:
    1,179
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I mostly agree with your thinking, John, but some of the justifications are a little off base. Eisenhower, Bradley, and Patton, were all West Point men. Audie Murphy was not drafted. He lied about his age to get in the army and was rejected for being under weight. He tried to join the Marines and the Navy, but they wouldn't have him because he was too puny. He ate a lot of biscuits and gravy and was eventually accepted by the Army. He could have sat the war out if he had wanted to. The draft did give us Mitchell (I think) and York. LeMay never wanted to be anything but a soldier. That whole airplane thing didn't come along till later.

    You don't really separate the needles from the haystack with a draft. Still, the idea that we should draft able bodied Americans (even the girlios*) for some sort of service is not a bad idea at all.

    *Except My daughter
     
    surjimmy likes this.

Share This Page