Tribal hunting/fishing compacts expiring

filbert

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If that's the case it's not a very smart move IMO . . . speaking of the gaming compacts, Stitt needs to do a much better job of explaining his position IMO. Press conferences at noon or during the day aren't winning when the tribes are spending thousands on commercials with former governors (one who didn't even sign a compact I don't think) endorsing the tribes.
If that's the case it's not a very smart move IMO . . . speaking of the gaming compacts, Stitt needs to do a much better job of explaining his position IMO. Press conferences at noon or during the day aren't winning when the tribes are spending thousands on commercials with former governors (one who didn't even sign a compact I don't think) endorsing the tribes.
Governor Stitt doesn't have money for commercials like the tribes, and maybe the tribes are using the hunting and fishing compacts as leverage, that can go both ways. I am disguised with all the people who think Stitt isn't handling this right. If you have a disagreement you say it and go on. The tribes weren't going to agree anyway, lets go to court and get it over, and I agree with Stitt that you don't have a compact with no expiration. And if I understand that the tribes only pay 3-6% of gross take, they have a great deal. Oklahoma is losing at that game. lol
 

filbert

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Yea and those governors are from both parties. Stitt is trying to strongarm the tribes on the gaming and he'll likely lose if history is an indicator. The state got their head handed to them on a platter when they tried to horn in on taxing the tribe on the Grand Casino (and their others) before.
Could you elaborate your last sentence, and tell me what happened about the state getting their headed handed to them?
 

Shadowrider

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Could you elaborate your last sentence, and tell me what happened about the state getting their headed handed to them?
It started with this.

Legal disputes first arose between CPN and the state in 2014. The Oklahoma Tax Commission filed a complaint in its administrative proceedings division to revoke permits for sales tax, low-point beer and mixed beverages at the Tribe’s enterprises. In accordance with the compact, the Nation requested arbitration to resolve the matter. Arbitrator Daniel J. Boudreau, a former Oklahoma Supreme Court Justice, ruled in favor of the Tribe in April 2016. United States District Judge Robin Cauthron affirmed the arbitration award on June 21, 2016.
https://www.potawatomi.org/cpn-state-of-oklahoma-reach-agreement-on-tax-issue/

I have to back up a bit here because I thought it was over back in 2016 and hadn't followed it. It seems the state appealed it and didn't really outright win, but instead they threw the whole thing out saying it was "unenforceable". So they got a complete new compact with the tribe. That's my understanding of it. I can't dig it up right now, but the state did some really blatant underhanded BS in the arbitration proceedings too (and lost). A point of reference is that the CPN tribe has always collected state and city tax on everything as far as I know. They still get repeatedly hammered. They are the most litigated tribe in America.
 

bigfug

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Good. Any hunting/fishing agreement should only apply to tribal land.

The tribe actually buys yearly licenses outright for its members, paying the state the fee for the license, and allowing the tribal members to get it through them rather than the state and the state charging the member. ODWC approved it, the hang up was the governors office. THe tribes wanted to purchase lifetime licenses, but the ODWC didn't want to, so they agreed to yearly licenses, probably because of the lost revenue potential.
 

filbert

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It started with this.



I have to back up a bit here because I thought it was over back in 2016 and hadn't followed it. It seems the state appealed it and didn't really outright win, but instead they threw the whole thing out saying it was "unenforceable". So they got a complete new compact with the tribe. That's my understanding of it. I can't dig it up right now, but the state did some really blatant underhanded BS in the arbitration proceedings too (and lost). A point of reference is that the CPN tribe has always collected state and city tax on everything as far as I know. They still get repeatedly hammered. They are the most litigated tribe in America.
Ok, thanks for replying. I didn't know, or forgot about all of this. Probably more like I forgot!
 

SMS

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The tribe actually buys yearly licenses outright for its members, paying the state the fee for the license, and allowing the tribal members to get it through them rather than the state and the state charging the member. ODWC approved it, the hang up was the governors office. THe tribes wanted to purchase lifetime licenses, but the ODWC didn't want to, so they agreed to yearly licenses, probably because of the lost revenue potential.

IIRC, the state gives the licenses to the tribes at a discounted rate...and those licenses are good on the same lands everyone else pays full price for.
 

bigfug

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IIRC, the state gives the licenses to the tribes at a discounted rate...and those licenses are good on the same lands everyone else pays full price for.
They do, but it generates a ton of revenue. I know the first year was like $375k total. They only pay $2 a license, but donated another $250k in donations and have to make a minimum purchase of 50k licenses. Supposedly it was going to be around $4 million dollars plus this year. Like everyone thinks I get this great deal on car tags. I get $25 back a year from the tribe after I pay the regular price.
 

dennishoddy

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The tribe actually buys yearly licenses outright for its members, paying the state the fee for the license, and allowing the tribal members to get it through them rather than the state and the state charging the member. ODWC approved it, the hang up was the governors office. THe tribes wanted to purchase lifetime licenses, but the ODWC didn't want to, so they agreed to yearly licenses, probably because of the lost revenue potential.

I keep seeing comments that the state got the money for the licenses.
The ODWC is 100% funded by license sales, revenue obtained from investments that come from lifetime license sales and federal funds from the Pittman/Robertson act.
Allowing the state to get the money from the state would be massive lost revenue to the ODW.
The ODW does not get any state tax money or legislative funding from the state.
 
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