Do farmers take vacations?

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okietom

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95% of people who claim farm income on their taxes have other jobs and income. Most farmers are part time farmers. 50% of those claiming farm income on their taxes sell less than $10k. I know farmers that farm full time and their wives have jobs. That is a great way to get heath insurance if you farm.

Yes, farmers take vacations because farmers are not really only farmers. They are really people that use farming as their side hustle. They have careers that are not farming careers. Stats on this are easy to find on farm service web sites. Farmers are really school teachers and mail men and welders and all kinds of other occupations. Now, I am a farmer too, with no farm income. I own a farm. I am retired from a life of work in western Oklahoma. Some time soon I hope to have a few cows. I have 110 acres with some grass, trees, a pond, and lots of wildlife.
 

okietom

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I grew up on a farm. We milked cows and raised mostly hay and feed, and a little wheat. Mom worked, Dad milked cows and did the farming. My brother and I helped some. We were both hiring out for any kind of paying labor we could get. I got paid well for hauling hay. Not so well for fixing fences and driving tractors.

I have never been far from farming but after high school not very involved in farming.
 

dennishoddy

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Retired farmer and rancher here.
Tried livestock for a few years. Market sucked and lost a ton of money. Farmed wheat on 980 acres forever before retirement and leasing for cash rent 7 or 8 years ago.
Worked at the power plant with tons of overtime so sometimes farming took the back stage as the power plant paid much better and the land was paid for. Off time spent restoring old farm implements one could buy for pennies on the dollar to work with. Yeah, it took me days vs hours that some could do with new bigger equipment, but I made money because 1/2 my crop wasn’t going to payments on equipment.
After dumping the cattle, vacations were easy to take. Always a dead time between planting and harvest especially for winter wheat.
 

Ready_fire_aim

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95% of people who claim farm income on their taxes have other jobs and income. Most farmers are part time farmers. 50% of those claiming farm income on their taxes sell less than $10k. I know farmers that farm full time and their wives have jobs. That is a great way to get heath insurance if you farm.

Yes, farmers take vacations because farmers are not really only farmers. They are really people that use farming as their side hustle. They have careers that are not farming careers. Stats on this are easy to find on farm service web sites. Farmers are really school teachers and mail men and welders and all kinds of other occupations. Now, I am a farmer too, with no farm income. I own a farm. I am retired from a life of work in western Oklahoma. Some time soon I hope to have a few cows. I have 110 acres with some grass, trees, a pond, and lots of wildlife.
Excellent points here! I have found this to be true with the majority farmers I’ve known/delt with
 

OK Corgi Rancher

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learn to check their eyes for symptoms of internal parasites and your life will be easier. nice thing is the twinning. learn the markets though. they don't market like cattle but the price per pound is quite high if they are the right size weight and condition when the market time hits.

When we got our goats I was worried about them getting worms since everyone said they were prone to that. The fella that cut our hay the first time told me he saw some sericea lespedeza in the hay field. I'd never heard of it so he showed me what it was. He said it was considered by lots of people to be an invasive plant...but then they found out it's a very effective, natural anti-parasite treatment for goats and some other animals.

We have an area behind the house that's covered with the stuff and the goats love it. When they don't get out to graze in that area I frequently cut some up and feed it to them in their pen. They eat as much as I bring them. So far we've not had a single problem with worms in our goats.


https://attra.ncat.org/publication/...rasites-in-small-ruminants-sericea-lespedeza/

Sericea LespedezA​

Sericea lespedeza is a high-tannin forage (4-15% DM) that has been scientifically proven to reduce parasite loads in sheep and goats. The mechanism of action is not yet known. Researchers believe that the plant tannins may affect parasites either directly or indirectly (or both). Tannins may react directly with adult worms by attaching to their “skin,” causing them distress, or indirectly by improving protein nutrition of the goat and boosting the immune system. In addition, tannins appear to reduce the hatching of fecal eggs and development of larvae, perhaps by binding to the larvae. (Min et al., 2005) The tannins could also bind with feed nutrients and possibly prevent bacterial growth in the feces (larva feed on bacteria) and so limit the feed available for larval growth, or in some other way inhibit larvae growth and movement. Adult worms residing in animals that are grazing sericea lespedeza shed fewer eggs, and the eggs that are produced have reduced hatching ability. However, when animals are moved off sericea lespedeza pastures and on to other forages, egg counts go back up, indicating that mature worms were inhibited but not killed in the short term. As animals are fed with sericea for longer periods of time, research has shown a reduction in mature worms as well. (Min et al., 2005, Shaik et al., 2006, Lange et al., 2006) Reducing pasture contamination and animal worm burdens will help sheep and goats to be healthier and more productive.
 

Mr.Glock

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When we got our goats I was worried about them getting worms since everyone said they were prone to that. The fella that cut our hay the first time told me he saw some sericea lespedeza in the hay field. I'd never heard of it so he showed me what it was. He said it was considered by lots of people to be an invasive plant...but then they found out it's a very effective, natural anti-parasite treatment for goats and some other animals.

We have an area behind the house that's covered with the stuff and the goats love it. When they don't get out to graze in that area I frequently cut some up and feed it to them in their pen. They eat as much as I bring them. So far we've not had a single problem with worms in our goats.


https://attra.ncat.org/publication/...rasites-in-small-ruminants-sericea-lespedeza/


You keep them in a good dry lot and that exponentially helps keep varying worms down. Growing up we ran between 600 to 800 Roping Calves every year. An old man that flagged the ropings told my dad that trick and WOW how it improved the calves health! And spraying the pens down helped.

The man explains the Lespedeza is spot on! We kept goats around in all our feedlots and pastures with cows, they are Weedeating MoFos!
 

Snattlerake

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95% of people who claim farm income on their taxes have other jobs and income. Most farmers are part time farmers. 50% of those claiming farm income on their taxes sell less than $10k. I know farmers that farm full time and their wives have jobs. That is a great way to get heath insurance if you farm.

Yes, farmers take vacations because farmers are not really only farmers. They are really people that use farming as their side hustle. They have careers that are not farming careers. Stats on this are easy to find on farm service web sites. Farmers are really school teachers and mail men and welders and all kinds of other occupations. Now, I am a farmer too, with no farm income. I own a farm. I am retired from a life of work in western Oklahoma. Some time soon I hope to have a few cows. I have 110 acres with some grass, trees, a pond, and lots of wildlife.
True. Dad was an accountant full time and I worked the farm. Mom was a housewife and helped Dad during tax season.
 

Hirschkopf

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One way for a farmer to take all the vacation the family wants is to rent the land to an operator through a management company. When my mother passed, my sister and I inherited some Kansas crop and pasture land. We converted all of the suitable pasture land to production acres. After a few years, we decided to let Farmers National Company manage it. The fee is reasonable: $600 yearly base and 10% of all income. For that, they find/manage a contracted operator, replace them as needed (just happened), pick the best lease terms (we do 1/3 crop share), advise on farming practice, deal with the paperwork for government contracts and insurance programs, provide all accounting needed for tax preparation, and market the grain. Worth every penny to me! Overall, my sister and I split about $25 to $70 of net income/acre/year depending on yield and grain prices. One is not going to get rich at that rate and it would take careful management by an operator to survive on twice that, as they pay for the equipment and fuel costs.

Given the right property; perhaps one with a home-site for the owner and some areas of wooded draws and a pond or two for family hunting/fishing, and the majority suitable for pasture or production, rent or crop share from on operator could cover the mortgage payment or a fraction of it. And, the owner could vacation - as long as somebody is taking care of any animals.
 
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TaterTot62

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I honestly think it sounds like a dumb question, but I’m curious. Those of you who farm/ranch, do you vacation regularly? What size is your operation? How do you manage to vacation?

I was talking with the wife about how we could pay for the land I want with a certain amount of productivity/livestock, and she hit me with the “how would we get away” question. Is it possible with a small operation?
Hate to say but she’s kind of correct. Really depends on what your doing. If you’re watching wheat grow then probably not. If you’re running livestock then probably not. Especially if to running a keep and feed then moving them on it takes a lot of time and care. The guys I know do it, Sikes putting eyes on them twice a day and dealing with problems you can’t predict. Worming, other injections, calving, feeding, if not grazing but feeding in the winter, getting them out of harmful situations like tangled up in fencing etc. Just seems there always something to do with cattle everyday. May not take all day but the supervision alone is everyday. Go talk with some cattle ranchers in your area.
 

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