Gunsmithing, licensed, and doing it the right way.

cdschoonie

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Dec 3, 2017
Messages
982
Reaction score
839
Location
Kingfisher, OK
I’d start by filling a niche. What’s your favorite gun? What part of your favorite firearm can you work on and do well?
Maybe start with a shop and just install sights and bore scope riflescopes. Then branch out from there. Those online courses are a waste. Darn everything you need to know is already on the Internet; albeit in 5 or 6 places, mixed in w nonsense, but it’s there. Take a class on lathe Operation, get one, thread barrels.
I have little esteem for folks that say they can do it all, because they’ll take your money and try. Never try, do. Hold yourself to a higher standard than other shops. and lastly, forget all this nonsense and get a job at Home Depot. You’ll wind up ahead, and still have your fun Firearm hobby
I’ve explored the ‘cool’ job ideas (Cabelas, BP, HD, Lowes), problem is they offer only $10-$12/hour. Kicker is I live in Kingfisher, and $1900 per month gross, just barely breaks me in the blue, by commute.
 

druryj

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
21,360
Reaction score
17,201
Location
Yukon, OK
Man, I'm also in no position to offer up much in the way of help, other than to tell you that Murray State College in Tishomingo offers a two-year A.S. Degree in Gunsmithing, which I understand is pretty well thought of. Of course, you'd have to move there to attend...jobs in Tish are a stretch I'd imagine, but it's something to maybe think about.

You sure have had a rough patch to hoe, get yourself well first brother, then chart your course and go for it. Hope you at least have some hot nurses to look at.
 

cdschoonie

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Dec 3, 2017
Messages
982
Reaction score
839
Location
Kingfisher, OK
Man, I'm also in no position to offer up much in the way of help, other than to tell you that Murray State College in Tishomingo offers a two-year A.S. Degree in Gunsmithing, which I understand is pretty well thought of. Of course, you'd have to move there to attend...jobs in Tish are a stretch I'd imagine, but it's something to maybe think about.

You sure have had a rough patch to hoe, get yourself well first brother, then chart your course and go for it. Hope you at least have some hot nurses to look at.
HAHA, I got my eye on a couple nurses.
Thanks everyone for the well wishes. I actually feel better than I have since February.
 

DRC458

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Mar 1, 2006
Messages
8,679
Reaction score
5,705
Location
Enid, OK.
Any idea the size, dimensions of a lathe to start looking at?

I wouldn't start looking for a lathe at all just yet. Have you got a Vo-Tech nearby that has a machine shop class? That's what I would look for first. Our Vo-Tech USED to have a machine shop program. Very nice shop and competent instructor. I'm glad I took the class when I did, because they have totally eliminated that program now. You'll learn a lot about machine operations, as well as what you want to look for in a lathe when you decide to shop for one.


.
 

mr ed

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Messages
5,323
Reaction score
2,359
Location
Tulsa
As a person with experience let me say.
1. Pick a specialty!
2. Don't try to fix anything and everything. Been there done that. 20 years.
A specialty is where its at and it's not ARs.
I'll tell you of a success story.
My roommate in gunsmith school (Trinidad) and I opened Gun shops at the same time in the '80s.
Me in Tulsa and Him in Kansas.
Both doing general repair. Pretty soon Scott figured out he couldn't make any money except the few weeks of pheasant season when he was covered up.
Me, I was covered up all the time, but it was old guys with junky old guns and you couldn't charge a decent rate to repair them.
I struggled on with what started as a joy and after many years became a job I hated.

I kind of wished I had followed my friend Scott's footsteps and what he did.
When Trulock Tru-Chokes came out he started advertising in the Shotgun news, Gunlist, and the American rifleman and setting up at the Shot show.
Pretty soon people all over the country were sending him barrels to be done.
It grew and grew. Before you knew it he had people working for him and had to expand.
He then invested in machinery to make his own choketubes and parts.
He's got a big company now.
Maybe you have heard of it?
Carlson's Choke Tubes of Atwood Kansas.

Specialize Specialize Specialize!
Even if you just want to do it as a hobby.
Pick something, Be the best at it. Charge a fair price. And you won't lose the joy!

Me? I found things I enjoy doing more than gunsmithing and had a great life too.
 

Glock 40

Problem Solver
Special Hen
Joined
Jun 14, 2005
Messages
6,268
Reaction score
9,272
Location
Tulsa
You may consider making knives. I have seen some crap called primitive that looks like an ape made it and folks buy them. Wont be near the start up costs and you can probably make coin quicker and then as your ability grows you can pick up some specialized gun smithing as has been said above. Totally agree on find something and specialize and be the best at it.
 
Top Bottom