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Is Your Gun a Weapon or a Talisman?

grwd

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9) If you have spouses/significant others or children, have you trained them in how to respond if it all goes down? Would they replicate this behavior if you asked them to do it RIGHT THIS MINUTE?

this is a big deal; my wife knows that when I tell her to do something in public, she needs to react instantly and quickly, whether its take cover, run, or go get the shotgun and hide in the tub.
 

JamesBell

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I am sincerely disappointed that I couldn't answer more of the questions in the way that they should be answered. I have had some great training and have had the fortune to talk with some people that I believe really know their stuff. And still, after reading this list, I know I'm not ready. So, it looks like its time to start preparing differently.
 

Kai

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So Michael,

What is your recommendation or advice for those everyday-carriers who may be in need of some intense training and preperation to face these deadly scenarios? As much as i'd love to, I don't have the time to train everyday, or even every other day.
 

Jerms

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training every day or every other day is important tho... even if it's just 30 minutes of thinking about it.. when i was training mma, my coach made me do 50 guard to armbars, 25 left and 25 right after every class.. at first i thought it was silly, not even remotely a "real" scenario... but when the time came in a fight and the opponent gave me a straight arm and it was just automatic armbar, so quick he didn't have time to react.

couple years later i was horsing around with a friend... same thing, got a straight arm, and it wasn't as smooth but it was still automatic, not even thinking about it straight into armbar...

after every class i left thinking about how much it sucked to have to do those 50 reps AFTER all the work done IN class, so i ended up thinking about it for the shower and entire drive home.. I honestly believe that helped as much as the physical motion.
 

jwcoopusa

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This from a Re-Late of mine who shoots more than most:

I have always shot more than most FBI, P.D. and S.O. officers I am aquainted with. The "liability hesitation" is what gets our officers killed. Every officer that does a "shoot" KNOWS beforehand that he/she is going to get cross examined - - second guessed by his own organization and then have to withstand the civil or criminal suit filed by the relatives of the shootee. In reality it is not much better for us civilians.

When a person is defending not only his family, but his family and himself FOR his family, it is NOT HIS PRIVILEGE TO LOSE!! Situational decisions should already be made as a part of your battle plans. I am an old heart patient that cannot run or fight. Situational awareness and shock and awe are my only options for not only survival but for the protection of my family. Practice. Front sight, squeeeeze is a modification of "Point Shooting".

I may not survive but I (pre)plan to damn sure make it not worth the effort for my adversary(s). That is a win.


I listen to this guy, because I know his background, his training, and his focus upon the basics of self-preservation. We would all do well to develop his mentality when it comes to the purpose of firearms for self-protection; but more importantly, perhaps, for protection of our Own.

-jwcusa-
 

OKC MAD COW

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My 2 cents here. I have a military background that taught me the benefit of training and muscle memory. The first time, while on a live fire training exercise, I was point and a pop-up target came out of nowhere. I recall shooting and the target going down. In the after action review, our CO asked me what I did, how many times I shot, and how it felt. To be honest, I could not really recall, "it all happend so fast". I told him I engaged the target with 2 or 3 shots, got on the ground and notifed the squad of contact. He informed me that in one movement, I dove to the ground fired 9 rounds in to / at the target and was screaming "contact, contact" the entire time. Wow. training really works.

We had a phrase that I live by. Train as you fight, fight as you train.

When I participate in IPSC or USPSA, I'm the guy with my little carry gun, in my normal holster, with my firearm concealed.

A final note, how often do you train with your carry ammo. Lots of post every where about how long you should keep it. But ask your self, do your hollow points, +P, or +P+ shoot different than your cheap practice ammo? Mine does. It's expensive but I train with my carry ammo frequently. I figure I'm worth it.

Great subject here. We're not perfect but I believe we help each other get better.

Thom
 

OUgunnut

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I shoot fairly often. Not hardcore defensive training. I have no doubt I am not 100% ready. The fact is though I know how to handle my weapons especially my carry pieces proficiently frontwards and backwards. Now I don't train with live targets or whatever and I honestly don't have the time to commit like you are speaking of in the original post. I feel more prepared being able to carry my weapon and knowing how to use it than I would without it. No doubt you are more ready than I. Honestly though that's ok. I think owning a firearm and practicing with it regularly is better than nothing. Not everyone can train for countless hours. A good example is when you hear in the news some 60-70 year old granny shoots and kills an intruder. It's likely she doesn't even practice anymore. She has the gun though, knows how to use it, and is willing to do so. Much better than being unarmed. I just think there is a very large range of being defensively ready for situations and there is nothing inherently wrong with not being the master.
 

Michael Brown

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I shoot fairly often. Not hardcore defensive training. I have no doubt I am not 100% ready. The fact is though I know how to handle my weapons especially my carry pieces proficiently frontwards and backwards. Now I don't train with live targets or whatever and I honestly don't have the time to commit like you are speaking of in the original post. I feel more prepared being able to carry my weapon and knowing how to use it than I would without it. No doubt you are more ready than I. Honestly though that's ok. I think owning a firearm and practicing with it regularly is better than nothing. Not everyone can train for countless hours. A good example is when you hear in the news some 60-70 year old granny shoots and kills an intruder. It's likely she doesn't even practice anymore. She has the gun though, knows how to use it, and is willing to do so. Much better than being unarmed. I just think there is a very large range of being defensively ready for situations and there is nothing inherently wrong with not being the master.

No one is suggesting that you have to do anything. This is America and everyone can do exactly as they wish.

What I am doing is providing a set of guidelines that can help you. If you choose to ignore them, that's your business.

None of the suggestions on the list require "countless hours". Some require nothing more than a good decision. Your choices are no skin off anyone else's back, so I say do whatever makes you happy.

I simply suggest that you don't kid yourself about your level of preparedness, although its certainly within your right to do so. When I eat a pizza instead of a grilled chicken breast, I don't kid myself that there aren't consequences with my choice despite the fact that there's nothing "inherently wrong" with pizza. If I do it, I accept the consequences after making an informed decision and weighing the cost vs. benefit.

If the cost of training outweighs the benefits to you, you have your answer. Personally, I'm too valuable to me (and hopefully my family) so I train hard.

Regarding grannie who probably doesn't practice succesfully repelling a boarder, I would offer that there are people who have survived jumping out of planes without parachutes.

But would you rather jump with a parachute or without one?

Again, any preparations you make are your choice alone. You and your family are the only ones who have to live with the consequences of that decision.

Michael Brown
 

OUgunnut

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No one is suggesting that you have to do anything. This is America and everyone can do exactly as they wish.

What I am doing is providing a set of guidelines that can help you. If you choose to ignore them, that's your business.

I simply suggest that you don't kid yourself about your level of preparedness, although its certainly within your right to do so.

I would also suggest that there are people who have survived jumping out of planes without parachutes.

But would you rather jump with a parachute or without one?

Again, any preparations you make are your choice alone. You and your family are the only ones who have to live with the consequences of that decision.

Michael Brown



I am not kidding myself about my preparedness. Your initial post just kinda comes off like if you aren't training like yada yada yada then you will perish (my shortened version).

I was simply pointing out that someone who owns a firearm and practices regularly is prepared more so than someone who does not. You make it sound like unless you are training as if it is your career then it doesn't amount to ****. I simply disagree. Not a big deal just voicing my opinion.

I'm not joking myself either. I know how to use my firearms and am willing to do so for myself and my family. I practice in a defensive manner using my ccw weapons and holster regularly but it's just using stationary paper targets. I do not think I am as ready as someone who trains like it is a career. Maybe some day I will be when I am not in dental school and have free time.
 

Michael Brown

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I am not kidding myself about my preparedness. Your initial post just kinda comes off like if you aren't training like yada yada yada then you will perish (my shortened version).

I was simply pointing out that someone who owns a firearm and practices regularly is prepared more so than someone who does not. You make it sound like unless you are training as if it is your career then it doesn't amount to ****. I simply disagree. Not a big deal just voicing my opinion.

I'm not joking myself either. I know how to use my firearms and am willing to do so for myself and my family. I practice in a defensive manner using my ccw weapons and holster regularly but it's just using stationary paper targets. I do not think I am as ready as someone who trains like it is a career. Maybe some day I will be when I am not in dental school and have free time.

Again, as I said, do whatever makes you happy.

If however you are just shooting paper targets, you are NOT training in a defensive manner. It is better than nothing, but it ignores the most important components of personal protection.

You may do other things that you haven't voiced here but I can only rely on what you have written.

If you don't like the way it's voiced, I can't help you with that.

If you are satisfied about the way you train, then my opinion should be the last thing in the world you should be concerned with.

However the fact that you've chosen to dissent indicates that you feel the need to justify what you do or you question it. If its justification, then refer to my above comment. If its because you have questions, simply read what's offered here for free, take what you like and discard the rest.

I'm simply here to help people prepare for violent confrontations and I give them the best advice I have based on my experience.

If it doesn't jive with your philosophy or goals, then feel free to discard it.

Again, you and your family are the only ones who have to live with the consequences of your decision.

Michael Brown
 
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