Tariffs: Saving American Jobs Since...Wait, What?

dennishoddy

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Soybeans, ethanaol-based corn...it's all just government subsidies, government picking winners and losers. BTW you misspelled ethanol. You like to call people out on that as some sort of feeling superior or something, so I thought I might call you out on the same thing for not the same reason.

You read it here, folks: dennishoddy hopes people choose to take government subsidies, because he's a conservative.
I've said zillions of times on this forum that I have never taken government subsidies. You can use your search foo and verify that.
I was speaking in generalities on the ethanol corn where the farmer that was quoted by Hobbs with the possibility that he could lose his farm, could break away from soybeans and maybe make some money. It's a free choice and I never said different. Thanks for trying to disparage and impune my comments.
 
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dennishoddy

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I don't think I called it "the death of farming"
The death of some farms that planted before the trade war started maybe.

GO hemp farmers!
Lets keep the records straight here as well. I retired from the power plant over three years ago and retired from farming other than a parcel last year. That doesn't mean I'm not on top of things as far as markets go because the farmer I lease to now with a degree from OSU in Ag is farming most of our land now. He still has to follow federal guidelines in farming and is up on his game.
You don't just go out and buy land now, and raise a family on it. There is crop reporting, projections of acreage planted in whatever, and so on. Certified seed growers have you by the nards, and so on. When you buy their seed, you have to sign your life away that you won't use it to plant next year and it all has to be sold.
It ain't go out, buy some land, plant some seed and see what happens any more. Part of the market where farmers make their money is when they project what and how many acres they are going to plant is part of the world market. I believe they call it the futures market for commodities?
There is not enough bandwidth on this forum to go into all the government regs involved in farming that I can post here. It's not a simple business.
 

Dave70968

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I've said zillions of times on this forum that I have never taken government subsidies. You can use your search foo and verify that.
I was speaking in generalities on the ethanol corn where the farmer that was quoted could break away from soybeans and maybe make some money. It's a free choice and I never said different. Thanks for trying to disparage and impune my comments.
I didn't say that you had; you continue to put words into my mouth, probably because it's easier to invent a straw man and argue with it than to argue what I'm actually saying. Though, if you've grown corn, I'd argue that you've taken indirect subsidies in the form of a guaranteed market buy (i.e. a mandate to blend a minimum amount of ethanol into gasoline).

There's a reason Chuck Grassley is nicknamed "the senator from Archer Daniels Midland."
 

dennishoddy

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I didn't say that you had; you continue to put words into my mouth, probably because it's easier to invent a straw man and argue with it than to argue what I'm actually saying. Though, if you've grown corn, I'd argue that you've taken indirect subsidies in the form of a guaranteed market buy (i.e. a mandate to blend a minimum amount of ethanol into gasoline).

There's a reason Chuck Grassley is nicknamed "the senator from Archer Daniels Midland."
For the record and you can look it up with your awesome search foo that I've also commented many times that I'm against the ethanol subsidies that are propping up corn prices.
Yet you comment that I'm a conservative and in favor of it. Come on man, you can't keep spinning your false comments directed at me.
Edit:
But, you would rather see a farm about to fail not take a shot at getting back up for another round of saving the family farm and not falling to the corporate farms that have a much greater chance of living on government subsidies?
Give the little guy a chance? Nah, you wouldn't do that.
 

Dave70968

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For the record and you can look it up with your awesome search foo that I've also commented many times that I'm against the ethanol subsidies that are propping up corn prices.
Yet you comment that I'm a conservative and in favor of it. Come on man, you can't keep spinning your false comments directed at me.
Edit:
But, you would rather see a farm about to fail not take a shot at getting back up for another round of saving the family farm and not falling to the corporate farms that have a much greater chance of living on government subsidies?
Give the little guy a chance? Nah, you wouldn't do that.
Hope he puts in some ethanol based corn next year
Yup. Real false comment there, suggesting that you're in favor of people taking advantage of the indirect subsidy (and, by extension, its existence, since the point would be moot if the subsidy didn't exist).

And yes, I'd love to see family farms succeed. The best way to do that is to get the government out of things; when government gets involved, it starts picking winners and losers, and (get ready for a real shocker here) the big guys are in a better position to influence government in a way that makes them the winners than the little guys are.
 

dennishoddy

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Yup. Real false comment there, suggesting that you're in favor of people taking advantage of the indirect subsidy (and, by extension, its existence, since the point would be moot if the subsidy didn't exist).

And yes, I'd love to see family farms succeed. The best way to do that is to get the government out of things; when government gets involved, it starts picking winners and losers, and (get ready for a real shocker here) the big guys are in a better position to influence government in a way that makes them the winners than the little guys are.

There you go again, taking a subjective comment about giving a farm a chance to stay private, and then spinning it one more time.
Now splain to me how your going to take the government out of the family farm with some of the comments made previously when they have you by the nards.
Splain to me how your going to get government out of farming at all? It ain't happening, and your living a dream world if you think it ever will because of the way I just explained that farming is part of the world market and the Commodities market has a say on what our farmers will plant next year because of a drought in the Crimea or Australia.
Again, It's not a plant a seed and sell a crop business.
Edit: Then you say you want family farms to succeed and in the next breath say "big guys" aka corporate farms are in a better position to influence government?
You do realize corporate farms live and profit on government subsidies as part of their operations?
 

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