A little help please

OkieRampage

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Hello,

I am new to deer hunting and still trying to learn more about it. I went hunting with my dad as a teenager but he did not really know what he was doing and did not teach me anything. Last year I went hunting with my uncle on his lease and got my first buck and doe at 35 years old. Unfortunately, he has a health condition that does not allow him to hunt anymore. I was lucky enough to draw for a rifle hunt on Lexington WMA this year. What advise would you give to a new hunter? What are some things to look for an satellite images to narrow down areas to scout. (I live in Yukon, have a full time job and a 2 year old son so I don't have the time to walk all of the almost 10,000 acres lol). Also, is it usually safe to put up trail cams on public land or do people tend to steal them? Just trying to learn things to help my 1 day hunt be successful. Thank you for any advise.
 

RickN

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I have not got to go deer hunting but I can answer about the trail cams. People will steal them if given half a chance. I am always hearing someone complain about theirs being stolen,
 

dennishoddy

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Welcome to deer hunting. Killed my first in 1980 and I’m still learning.
Deer are edge dwellers. They typically walk around open areas just inside the woods. They are also creatures of habit, walking the same trail constantly.
If I’m hunting a new area for the first time I look for an area where several trails may intersect with trees available to put a stand in. I love creek crossings. Deer will pick the easiest way to get across a creek. Trails may be from many different directions but they all funnel to that one spot that is easiest to cross.
One thing to keep on your mind at all times is the wind. If your walking with the wind at your back, every deer a mile downwind is alerted to you being there. Same with putting up a stand. Be ready with several options to put up your stand depending on wind direction.
Good luck on your hunt!
 

diggler1833

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Trail cameras discovered by people often go missing.

Deer essentially have the same nose as a hound. They can pick you off downwind a lot further than people think. Likewise, that trail of scent you left going in is going to be picked up for days. Hunt facing the wind, and never walk through an area you plan on hunting.

Deer vision isn't as acute as yours, but their ability to see movement is greater.

Elevation changes, water access, viable food sources, and clearings are all things I would look for if studying satellite images. Find a water source near a clearing, with oak trees and some elevation change in there (can bed out of the wind) and you've got a start for scouting.

The further in you can go on public land the better usually. Let the other hunters work for you (pushing game).
 

HoLeChit

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I dont hunt deer, but I can offer this:

Satellite imagery is great and all, but actually being there can tell a whole different story. I typically use satellite imagery to plan where I am going, and then go scout it out on foot. Places that looked like a walk in the park can actually be chest deep grass, not so much fun.

scouting can honestly be half the fun. Bring a squirrel or hog gun, and go wander around. I also highly suggest paying for a wildlife atlas from the ODWC. It can be extremely handy while out and about, as well as for planning your trips. It will have roads, cultivated areas, ponds, and minor terrain features all labeled, as well as camping areas. Highly suggested, and at $25 I've certainly gotten my money out of it. https://license.gooutdoorsoklahoma....?inventoryId=33&licenseTypeId=2220&groupId=26
 

clintbailey

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As HoLeChit said, the WMA atlas is a good tool to have, especially if you plan to hunt more or different public lands in OK. They show access points, food plots, etc. If it was a drier year, I would advise to hunt any water sources, but since its pouring in western OK again as I type, maybe not a good strategy this year. Check satellite imagery for food sources like oak groves (acorns), planted crops, etc. Even if the food is not on the public land, you can hunt trails going on/off the public land. Good luck!
 
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