F-250 diesel trucks, ...I need schooling

Ryan500L

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Yeah I owned a 6.9l, a 7.3l IDI, a 7.3l and a 6.0l before my 6.7l. The 7.3l and 6.0l will start at zero or just below without being plugged in. The 6.9l and 7.3lIDI wouldn't for me.
The only 7.3 I owned was an '89 Super Duty that had probably 200k on it and it hated weather below 50. I put new glow plugs in it and it still wouldn't start if it wasn't plugged in. I had an '04 6.0 that had 250k before I had to replace 4 glow plugs so there definitely better than the old 7.3s and 6.9s, I heard you had change those about every winter. I really liked my 6.0, had to spend some money on it like all of them but I never had a programmer on it and never had the head gasket issues or blew the motor up. I drove it for 12 years and I've never kept a truck that long. Didn't really want to sell it but I figured I better because I would never be able to get the money I got for it again!
 

Okie4570

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The only 7.3 I owned was an '89 Super Duty that had probably 200k on it and it hated weather below 50. I put new glow plugs in it and it still wouldn't start if it wasn't plugged in. I had an '04 6.0 that had 250k before I had to replace 4 glow plugs so there definitely better than the old 7.3s and 6.9s, I heard you had change those about every winter. I really liked my 6.0, had to spend some money on it like all of them but I never had a programmer on it and never had the head gasket issues or blew the motor up. I drove it for 12 years and I've never kept a truck that long. Didn't really want to sell it but I figured I better because I would never be able to get the money I got for it again!
Exactly, same here, I drove my 6.0l and didn't race it lol.
 

Aries

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Cold weather starts aren't an issue in Oklahoma anyway. The lowest we get is about 0 degrees during a fluke cold spell, and it doesn't stay there more than a couple of days then we're back up into the 20s. Even so, you can still start the 7.3 in that weather without using a block heater. I've done it several times.
It seems like I remember 100 straight days of 50 below zero last winter! :rollingla
 

MacFromOK

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Cold weather starts aren't an issue in Oklahoma anyway. The lowest we get is about 0 degrees during a fluke cold spell, and it doesn't stay there more than a couple of days then we're back up into the 20s.
Where were you last winter, when it got down to eleven below zero here in Marshall County (just north of Lake Texoma)... :shocked:

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CC379

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I'm seriously laughing at all the people who buy 3/4 and 1 ton dump trucks then ***** about the ride quality. Go buy a car. And stop swerving into the oncoming traffic trying to avoid potholes.

OP, nobody buys a Ford anymore to keep for 15 plus years. Most of the DD diesels are owned by people who just want the newest. When they start adding up tires and oil changes, turbo and oil pump replacement and the ocassional intercooler, they all sell them. Start adding in fuel and DEF and the cost keeps rising. Now add all that to the note of the truck. Is it really that much better than your current truck? BTW, I only got about 16 MPG in my 04 6.0 loaded or unloaded. So the mileage compared to your current 3/4 ton is moot. Whatever mileage a Dodge owner tells you they get, subtract 20 from it and that's closer to the truth. Most gas engines are adequate for towing these days and cost less to own over the life of the vehicle. Bells and whistles are a preference thing, but like I already said, your looking for a dump truck to drive daily. Don't expect it to be a smooth ride.
on long interstate drives my 2001 5.9 Cummins usually does around 20mpg highest I remember was 21, daily driving it gets right at 15mpg. The fuel gauge broke on my 01 in Tennessee when I was pulling a 16' bumper trailer started driving 55 or slower creeping up hills was getting 20 but not how I would ever drive again. local mailman owned several diesels ford chevy & dodge, he went back to gas trucks because the mileage is about the same. he has always been a propane fan so his gas trucks run on propane not sure what lp mileage is but you know its got to be pretty lower,
 

16colt

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I have a 2011 w/ 6.7 Powerstroke. Truck is great and I have owned it since new w/ zero issues. The 6.7 is quiet and runs smooth. I have also owned a 6.0 and 7.3 diesel and even though those were both ran well while I owned them, they just are not as refined as the 6.7.
I agree that a gasser will pull well enough for most, but my vote still goes to the 6.7.
 

old John

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Both Chevy and Ford no longer use oil pressure regulated injectors, and haven't for almost 15y. Cold weather starts aren't an issue.
That was suppose to be my attemt at HUMOR! Lighten up, All the above are great diesel trucks,! At higher elevations these Diesel trucks just get better milage, and have more power! That is why you see so many in the rocky Mountains, I guess? I sold my '97, 3500 Dodge to my son in 04 when I bought a new one, Good truck, with 100,000 miles. The started went out, and he replaced it with one from China at a auto parts store. The eplacement starters would last a week, and then fail, he got another on warranty, but got tired of changing them once a week! He finally had to buy a rebuilt Cummings starter, for about $700.00 I think. A news communings was over $1000.00! Just a heads up, if you starter goes out, have the Cummings or likely the Ford, or Chevy Diesel starter rebuilt! We didn't know at the time, A Cummings starter delivers 24 volts initially, then drops back to 12 votes, to turn the Diesel engine over!
 

CC379

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That was suppose to be my attemt at HUMOR! Lighten up, All the above are great diesel trucks,! At higher elevations these Diesel trucks just get better milage, and have more power! That is why you see so many in the rocky Mountains, I guess? I sold my '97, 3500 Dodge to my son in 04 when I bought a new one, Good truck, with 100,000 miles. The started went out, and he replaced it with one from China at a auto parts store. The eplacement starters would last a week, and then fail, he got another on warranty, but got tired of changing them once a week! He finally had to buy a rebuilt Cummings starter, for about $700.00 I think. A news communings was over $1000.00! Just a heads up, if you starter goes out, have the Cummings or likely the Ford, or Chevy Diesel starter rebuilt! We didn't know at the time, A Cummings starter delivers 24 volts initially, then drops back to 12 votes, to turn the Diesel engine over!
next time your starter stops working pull it off and put this kit in it, only costs $19.95 and the starter will last forever, those two little brass contacts are about twice as thick as standard

 

edl

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Here is my response.
In 2017 we had a Tundra 1/2 ton gasser. 383 HP with 430 lbs of torque, 6 speed tranny.
We towed a 29' bumper pull RV that weighed 12,000 lbs loaded as weighed on a CAT scale.
Pulled that rig thousands of miles at highway speeds needing an air bag set up to keep the bed level with zero issues except for one on a 8 degree grade where we had to stop mid climb so the wife could take a pic. Speed limit 65, we could only get to 60.
In the years traveling while pulling RV's, with a Toyota gasser always wondered if a diesel would be better. More torque, equal HP.
In 2019 we summered at an RV park in Antinito Co for two months. During that two months, three diesels, one a chevy and the other ford lost engines to intercoolers, with the other ford to losing head gaskets. Chevy guy had to sell his two year old back to a dealer for chump change and buy a new truck as he had to get home.
Ford guy that lost gaskets was next to me. He spent a month tearing it down, putting the parts on the picnic table and rebuilding it on the spot. He got it running and left.
Next ford guy losing intercooler was a friend with the 6. something. Zero diesel mechanics in the area even at dealerships. He finally found some guy that used to be a diesel mechanic that currently worked for the highway dept. Said he would work on it on weekends. A month later, it was ready with a $9000 tab.....not really fixed but it ran. When getting it back to South Tx it cost buddy another $3000 to get all the BS the guy in Colorado screwed up fixed. Now we are looking at $12K for an older truck that wasn't worth that much but they had to get home a month later than planned.
Last year we bought a new rv and f-250 Super Duty with the 7.3 liter gasser, 10 speed tranny and 4:30 pulling gears.
5th wheel Rig weighs in at a tad more than 16,000 lbs depending on how we load it.
I can set the cruise on 70 mph and drive all day long going up mountains in the western states we visited this summer while maintaining the 70 mph speeds. Never had an issue with the 430 hp and 480 lb torque.
IMHO, the 10 speed transmission is the star of the game for pulling loads. Impressive.
If for instance I cratered the 7,3 gasser, I can buy a complete engine installed for around 7K, and every dealership can do it vs the diesel where limited dealerships can do it.
So, to the OP, this is my personal experience. Unbiased as I thought I would need a diesel to pull the load we have now, but in reality, we didn't need one.
Others may disagree, and I'll respect their opinions.
We have pulled that rig 24,000 miles since last August when taking possession of the truck so not speaking of some weekend pulling.
Would you buy this setup again? Is there anything you would do differently? Thank you.
 

MR.T.

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That was suppose to be my attemt at HUMOR! Lighten up, All the above are great diesel trucks,! At higher elevations these Diesel trucks just get better milage, and have more power! That is why you see so many in the rocky Mountains, I guess? I sold my '97, 3500 Dodge to my son in 04 when I bought a new one, Good truck, with 100,000 miles. The started went out, and he replaced it with one from China at a auto parts store. The eplacement starters would last a week, and then fail, he got another on warranty, but got tired of changing them once a week! He finally had to buy a rebuilt Cummings starter, for about $700.00 I think. A news communings was over $1000.00! Just a heads up, if you starter goes out, have the Cummings or likely the Ford, or Chevy Diesel starter rebuilt! We didn't know at the time, A Cummings starter delivers 24 volts initially, then drops back to 12 votes, to turn the Diesel engine over!
Don't know what the difference is,
But I replaced the starter on my dads truck with one from the parts store. The cost on it was around $120. Still going good & strong 6 years later.
 
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