Watch Rebuild – OSA Member Owned – U.S. Contract Pilot's Watch Issued In Vietnam – LONG POST - PIC HEAVY

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thor447

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Nice work. It still amazes me that watches can be made that small and can be fairly accurate, time wise, mechanically
I completely agree. That’s what drew me into them as well.

Just for a little perspective, the screw I’m holding in my hand in the pic below is the one that attaches the setting lever spring/cover plate on the dial side of the watch. In other watches, especially automatics, screws get much smaller than this. It just amazes me how something that small can be machined.

AFB37B3A-3ED2-4810-8780-A6CFD0110144.jpeg


Here is a photo of the hair spring from the second watch I spoke about, and was the cause of its irregular time keeping.

6F028F33-E545-4104-AA6A-59FB7E72B43B.jpeg


How they make those parts today, even
more so making them 100+ years ago, is just incredible to me.
 

Bocephus123

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I completely agree. That’s what drew me into them as well.

Just for a little perspective, the screw I’m holding in my hand in the pic below is the one that attaches the setting lever spring/cover plate on the dial side of the watch. In other watches, especially automatics, screws get much smaller than this. It just amazes me how something that small can be machined.

View attachment 322836

Here is a photo of the hair spring from the second watch I spoke about, and was the cause of its irregular time keeping.

View attachment 322837

How they make those parts today, even
more so making them 100+ years ago, is just incredible to me.
Im Out. don't know how you do it. now i wish i kept my grandfathers pocket watch thought it was unfixable!
 

Hangfire

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I'm the fella that owns the old Benrus VN era military issue wrist watch.

I acquired and wore the watch in VN after I returned to work there as a civilian after getting out of the Army and I later wore it for over 2 yrs. while working in Libya.......it is also the watch that I've always worn when hunting.

Before @thor447 worked on my watch we had met a few times to do a little horse trading so we already knew each other and I can't say enough good about the man......he's good people.

Thank you again sir ! !
 

Bocephus123

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I'm the fella that owns the old Benrus VN era military issue wrist watch.

I acquired and wore the watch in VN after I returned to work there as a civilian after getting out of the Army and I later wore it for over 2 yrs. while working in Libya.......it is also the watch that I've always worn when hunting.

Before @thor447 worked on my watch we had met a few times to do a little horse trading so we already knew each other and I can't say enough good about the man......he's good people.

Thank you again sir ! !
should be good for a long time now.
 

Shadowrider

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I completely agree. That’s what drew me into them as well.

Just for a little perspective, the screw I’m holding in my hand in the pic below is the one that attaches the setting lever spring/cover plate on the dial side of the watch. In other watches, especially automatics, screws get much smaller than this. It just amazes me how something that small can be machined.

View attachment 322836

Here is a photo of the hair spring from the second watch I spoke about, and was the cause of its irregular time keeping.

View attachment 322837

How they make those parts today, even
more so making them 100+ years ago, is just incredible to me.
I spent 25 years in machining and manufacturing and I'm too amazed at how they make stuff so small myself.

My great uncle who I started working for part time when in high school and was a borderline genius, told me a joke once. It was about the Germans and Swiss always trying to outdo each other in watch making way back in the early days of watchmaking. The Swiss were always the best at it and the Germans finally succeeded in making the world's smallest watch spring, so small you had to have a microscope to even see it. A feat never before even imaginable, it was so small. The Germans were very proud of it. They sent it to the Swiss and boasted. "We finally have beaten you, there's no way you can compare with such precision as this". The Swiss sent it back with a note saying "That's very good work, but if you'll look we drilled a hole in it".
 

TerryMiller

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I completely agree. That’s what drew me into them as well.

Just for a little perspective, the screw I’m holding in my hand in the pic below is the one that attaches the setting lever spring/cover plate on the dial side of the watch. In other watches, especially automatics, screws get much smaller than this. It just amazes me how something that small can be machined.

View attachment 322836



How they make those parts today, even
more so making them 100+ years ago, is just incredible to me.

And to think guys here on OSA complain about losing a spring or something from working on their firearms.

Let them go looking for that screw.
 

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