Water well question

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fatcpa

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We recently bought a house with a water well on the property. We have city water service for the house, but would like to water the yard with the well water. We had a well service change out the downhole pump, pressure tank and all the associated plumbing. The well guy said that the well had plenty of water. The problem now is that when my wife waters, after the pressure switch kicks the pump back on, the pump is never able to replenish the water in the pressure tank. The pump continues to pump water at about 12 pounds on the pressure gauge for about 15 minutes, then the pump shuts off. I assume that the pump is shutting off to prevent overheating. Is the problem that the pump is too small, the pressure tank is too small, we’re expecting too much, or what?
 

montesa

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Did you check the connections on the pressure switch? Did you check to make sure the pressure bladder has the right amount of air in it? Are you sure there are no leaks somewhere else in your system? I would run the hose off of your tank tee and see if it has strong pressure. It’ll really pump a lot of water if it’s working correctly at all.

You might also check the breaker that’s running the pump. Make sure the wire screw clamps are tight on the breaker.
 

SoonerP226

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It’s possible that you’ve discovered why there’s city water when you have an active well. You may be exceeding the recharge rate of the well—there may be plenty of water, but if your pump draws water out faster than the dirt and rock around it will allow to the water to flow back into the well, it’s not going to go, umm, well.

My old boss’s place was like that. He had a well with water in it, but the recharge rate was too low to support a modern home, so it also had city water to feed the house.
 

cowadle

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if you aren't pumping air then the recharge rate is fine. if the pump will charge thea tank and the pressure switch shuts off the pump when not watering then the system is fine. if the demand or the sprinkler exceeds the gallon per minute of the pump then you will experience just what you describe. you should have the well tested to see what the capacity is so you can buy a pump and sprinkler that will all work together.
 

dennishoddy

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It’s possible that you’ve discovered why there’s city water when you have an active well. You may be exceeding the recharge rate of the well—there may be plenty of water, but if your pump draws water out faster than the dirt and rock around it will allow to the water to flow back into the well, it’s not going to go, umm, well.

My old boss’s place was like that. He had a well with water in it, but the recharge rate was too low to support a modern home, so it also had city water to feed the house.
Best to add a low pressure cut off switch in that scenario to save the pump from running dry.
The OP may already have one installed since his pump shuts off automatically?
 

cowadle

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to test the well you need a submersible pump that exceeds the wells ability to recharge. you put a valve on the discharge of the pump so that when the well surges you can gradually close the valve until the well can keep up with the demand for at least 30 min. then you can catch the water in a known capacity container and time the fill time. then you will know the capacity in gpm of your well so you can have the system set up for good dependable service.
 

Timmy59

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It’s possible that you’ve discovered why there’s city water when you have an active well. You may be exceeding the recharge rate of the well—there may be plenty of water, but if your pump draws water out faster than the dirt and rock around it will allow to the water to flow back into the well, it’s not going to go, umm, well.

My old boss’s place was like that. He had a well with water in it, but the recharge rate was too low to support a modern home, so it also had city water to feed the house.
ECHO.
 

Mr.Glock

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Where are you located?
Turn power off.
Drain water completely out of Tank.
Pull Pressure Switch Cap off and read inside on the lid the pressures, 30-50 or 40-50. Which ever one it is, set the tank to 28 or 38 psi, with the tank completely empty. I bet it is a 30-50.

Try that first.
 

Perplexed

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It’s possible that you’ve discovered why there’s city water when you have an active well. You may be exceeding the recharge rate of the well—there may be plenty of water, but if your pump draws water out faster than the dirt and rock around it will allow to the water to flow back into the well, it’s not going to go, umm, well.

My old boss’s place was like that. He had a well with water in it, but the recharge rate was too low to support a modern home, so it also had city water to feed the house.

This. I’m on well water, and I have a 500-gallon cistern between the well and the house. Over time, the well pump fills up the cistern when water is available in the well, and a pump in the cistern provides water to the house. I’ve never run dry.
 

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