Water well/pump pressure question

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okietool

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C_Hallbert

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If you have a shallow well and the pump is capable of 50-60 psi in a pressurized ‘reservoir’ tank and the pressure control valve is properly adjusted but the system doesn’t reach cutoff pressure, it is probable that there’s a leak in the pipe between the pump and the pressure tank, or between the pressure tank and the hydrant…..
 

jackinok09

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If you have a shallow well and the pump is capable of 50-60 psi in a pressurized ‘reservoir’ tank and the pressure control valve is properly adjusted but the system doesn’t reach cutoff pressure, it is probable that there’s a leak in the pipe between the pump and the pressure tank, or between the pressure tank and the hydrant…..
Or the pumps worn so it doesn't reach rated capacity
 

BryanDP

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I'm familiar with the saying to which this meme pertains but I'm not understanding how it applies here. Did I ask a question that has been asked many times before? My apologies if so.

If you have a shallow well and the pump is capable of 50-60 psi in a pressurized ‘reservoir’ tank and the pressure control valve is properly adjusted but the system doesn’t reach cutoff pressure, it is probable that there’s a leak in the pipe between the pump and the pressure tank, or between the pressure tank and the hydrant…..

I don't have a well. I pump from a spring-fed pond and the intake check valve for the pump is about 10 feet at most below the elevation where the pump is located.

It does reach cutoff pressure, it's just that when it was hitting the low limit the shower had gone to a trickle.

Or the pumps worn so it doesn't reach rated capacity

My old pump did this, got a new one and it behaved similarly.

However, I have an update:

This weekend we did some yard work and got all sweaty so I jumped in the shower expecting it to be weak and and it held great pressure. It varied a bit but never got to a trickle like it had the previous try about a week ago. I may install a second pressure tank just for even better and more steady pressure but its' certainly not urgent now.

I theorize that last week when we were having trouble with it there was still air in the lines that was more responsible for the trickle than the pump hitting the low limit. This time the shower kind of "coughed" when I first turned it on and then had great pressure for several showers. Is it possible that air in the lines finally made their way to the faucets after sitting for a week without running?
 

BryanDP

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Short answer yes it is. if your using a shallow well pump with a tank with no bladder it's almost a guarantee without a purge valve.

It's a shallow well pump mounted on top of a 5 gallon tank that has a bladder inside set at 32 psi per the manufacturer's instructions. Pressure at the shower fluctuated from decent to horrible with our old pump and when we first installed the new one. It then set for a week and was much better when we tried it again. Regardless, I think we are going to install a 40 gallon tank in our building. It has a bladder that can be inflated to 50 psi, which we'll get close to. We're also installing a check valve so that "up to 50 psi" pressure doesn't back feed pressure down to the pump that fluctuates from 30-50 psi pumping pressure.
 

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