Lumber Prices Record Biggest Weekly Drop Ever

BrandonM

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Feb 21, 2009
Messages
3,663
Reaction score
725
Location
Bixby
Why is that?

Please enlighten me!

It just seems it would be a good thing since there is so many nasty tornados there!
It’s usually the water table and leakage. I’ve seen one basement and several storm cellars with a foot or two of water in them just from ground seepage through the walls. I’m sure it’s doable with the right plan and construction up front. I assume it’s extremely cost prohibitive or they would be all over Oklahoma considering our weather. They aren’t though.
 

Aku

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
Messages
520
Reaction score
1,014
Location
Del City
Why is that?

Please enlighten me!

It just seems it would be a good thing since there is so many nasty tornados there!
The old storm shelter added to the house in '56 was concrete and continued to seep water. Could never keep the water out of it. Several years ago bought a garage unit from Ground Zero out of Perry, well built, keeps the water out.
 

OHJEEZE

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Jun 9, 2021
Messages
440
Reaction score
484
Location
Not in Oklahoma!
It’s usually the water table and leakage. I’ve seen one basement and several storm cellars with a foot or two of water in them just from ground seepage through the walls. I’m sure it’s doable with the right plan and construction up front. I assume it’s extremely cost prohibitive or they would be all over Oklahoma considering our weather. They aren’t though.
Where I am at (Oh-Hi-Oh) basements are real common.

And we rarely have a shortage of water.

Basements are coated with mortar on the outside of the cement blocks, then sprayed with tar.

Footer drains go around the outside and (should) go around the inside.

They drain into a crock where there is a pump to get rid of the water.

Proper backfill is washed gravel.

It is real important to have good gutters and down spouts to get the roof water away!
 

tyromeo55

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2007
Messages
4,747
Reaction score
1,290
Location
Tulsa
Where I am at (Oh-Hi-Oh) basements are real common.

And we rarely have a shortage of water.

Basements are coated with mortar on the outside of the cement blocks, then sprayed with tar.

Footer drains go around the outside and (should) go around the inside.

They drain into a crock where there is a pump to get rid of the water.

Proper backfill is washed gravel.

It is real important to have good gutters and down spouts to get the roof water away!
The soil here is horrible for them. It really doesn’t matter what you do they will leak.
One of the rent houses (older home) has one and it is mostly on its own little hill as so that the basement is mostly at grade. Unless the pump is maintained it will gain a significant level of water. Even if you bitumen - membrane -bitumen the movement and hydraulic pressure will make a way in over time. There just isn’t anywhere for the water to be drained
 

tyromeo55

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2007
Messages
4,747
Reaction score
1,290
Location
Tulsa
This guy has some good updates on pricing. He’s in Oregon, but buys from big box stores.
He has a good update from this morning:

I like that guy. I’ve noticed that our prices lag 2-4 weeks from what he is seeing. Also he seems to of started a lot higher then us. I don’t reacall ever seeing $81 CDX here
 

Aries

Sharpshooter
Special Hen Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
4,013
Reaction score
5,245
Location
Sapulpa
I've never had a basement, but I've heard the clay content in most of the soil around here makes them impractical. I dunno, just something I remember hearing...
 

SoonerP226

Sharpshooter
Special Hen
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
8,463
Reaction score
4,529
Location
Norman
I've never had a basement, but I've heard the clay content in most of the soil around here makes them impractical. I dunno, just something I remember hearing...
It is the high clay content in the soil, combined with high water tables, that causes most cellars/basements in Oklahoma to leak. My house is one of the exceptions that proves the rule--its basement doesn't leak, but the soil surrounding the house is exceptionally sandy.
 
Top Bottom