Book recommendations

SoonerP226

Sharpshooter
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
8,121
Reaction score
4,027
Location
Norman
If you're an Audible member, they're having a $5 sale that's actually worth a darn. Clint Romesha's Red Platoon, Mat Best's Thank You For My Service, Benjamin Franklin's autobiography, Chester Nez's Code Talker, Mark Owen's No Easy Day, and many more good books are included.
 

rawhide

Sharpshooter
Joined
Mar 12, 2008
Messages
3,834
Reaction score
784
Location
Lincoln Co.
"Killers of the Flower Moon."
"Empire of the Summer Moon."
I highly recommend both of these. Some great firearms history in "Summer Moon."

Haven't had time for to read like I'd like the last few years but another I'd recommend is Stephen Ambrose's "Pegasus Bridge" about the British special forces team was first in by glider on D-Day.
 

wawazat

Sharpshooter
Supporter
Joined
Nov 25, 2014
Messages
290
Reaction score
419
Location
OKC, OK
Im about to start the 3rd book in The New World Series by G. Michael Hopf. It kicks off with The End and is about the societal and government collapse of the United States following nuclear attacks. I am averaging a book a week so far, it definitely pulls you in.
 

xseler

These are not the firearms you're looking for.
Supporter
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
3,780
Reaction score
5,982
Location
Moore, OK
Im about to start the 3rd book in The New World Series by G. Michael Hopf. It kicks off with The End and is about the societal and government collapse of the United States following nuclear attacks. I am averaging a book a week so far, it definitely pulls you in.

This sounds like a series I might start. Thanks for the info!!



.
 

gerhard1

Sharpshooter
Supporter
Joined
Dec 8, 2008
Messages
3,897
Reaction score
2,429
Location
Rural Grant County
This thread may interest some of you.

 

wawazat

Sharpshooter
Supporter
Joined
Nov 25, 2014
Messages
290
Reaction score
419
Location
OKC, OK
This thread may interest some of you.

Your book The Pale Horse is on my list as well as soon as I finish this series.
 

kroberts2131

Sharpshooter
Joined
Apr 29, 2010
Messages
2,730
Reaction score
300
Location
Coweta
Jack Carr's Terminal List series is pretty good. He also reads "mean reviews" of his books on his YouTube channel. Before he retired from the Teams, he was asked to put together a reading list for the Naval Special Warfare command, and every month he puts out a reading list. Sometimes they're just good reads, and sometimes they're books that he's used as reference materials for his novels. You can find it here ( https://bookshop.org/shop/jackcarrusa ), a site that lets you order the books online while helping local bookstores.

There are some pretty gruesome scenes in his novels, and much of his writing is informed by his career as a SEAL, so you can be pretty sure that most of those scenes actually happened at some point. (There's a scene involving a karambit in The Terminal List that he has talked about on a few podcasts; gruesome as it was, it was a technique actually used by the Shining Path guerillas.)

James Hornfischer's WWII naval history books are outstanding. Last Stand Of the Tin Can Sailors, about the Battle Off Samar, is an amazing story that's exceptionally well told. Neptune's Inferno covers the naval battles of Guadalcanal, and The Fleet At Flood Tide generally follows Admiral Raymond Spruance through the war. (He has a fourth book, Ship Of Ghosts, about the USS Houston, that I haven't read.)

The irony of Last Stand and Inferno is that Last Stand will leave you understanding how we won WWII, and Inferno will leave you wondering how we won. Last Stand is about men taking the reins and charging into battle with no realistic hope of survival, yet somehow pulling off the unthinkable and turning back a vastly superior force, whereas Inferno is the epitome of the USN saying, "never let progress stand in the way of tradition."

Andy Weir's The Martian and Project Hail Mary are both excellent reads. I would recommend listening to the Audible version of Project Hail Mary, as there are some things in it that are better heard than read. (Weir's second novel, Artemis, is OK, but not nearly as good as the first and third.) All three novels are stand-alone stories, so you can read them in any order you choose. I would recommend not reading about or listening to anything involving Project Hail Mary before reading it, though, as it's very difficult to say anything about it without spoiling something. I wouldn't even read the publisher's blurb about it if you order it online.

Jack Campbell's Lost Fleet series is really good if you like "naval battles in space" sorts of sci-fi. The hero of the story is a man whose last action in battle (a headlong, hopeless charge at the enemy) prevented the destruction of his side's fleet, but he was thought lost. At the opening of the first novel, it's a century later, and his stasis pod has just been found by a massive fleet on its way to a sneak attack on the enemy.

The sneak attack turns out to be a trap, and all of the officers of flag rank are killed, leaving the hero (a Commander when he was lost, "posthumously" promoted to Captain) as the senior officer in the fleet due to his time in grade. After a century of warfare, he is also the only officer left on either side who understands strategy; essentially, the primary tactic of both fleets is the headlong charge (ironically taken from the hero's last-ditch effort), which results in high losses among the younger, bolder officers, so they lose and never get to rebuild the tactical or strategic experience.

The Lost Fleet novels can each stand on their own, but it is better to read them in order, as there is a through-line in the over-arching story of the attempt to get the Lost Fleet home.
Just finished project Hail Mary. It was good but the ending just kinda left me disappointed.
Currently reading the terminal list also. The first book is an excellent read this far
 

sherrick13

Sharpshooter
Supporter
Joined
Oct 26, 2009
Messages
413
Reaction score
466
Location
Edmond
Jack Carr's Terminal List series is pretty good. He also reads "mean reviews" of his books on his YouTube channel. Before he retired from the Teams, he was asked to put together a reading list for the Naval Special Warfare command, and every month he puts out a reading list. Sometimes they're just good reads, and sometimes they're books that he's used as reference materials for his novels. You can find it here ( https://bookshop.org/shop/jackcarrusa ), a site that lets you order the books online while helping local bookstores.

There are some pretty gruesome scenes in his novels, and much of his writing is informed by his career as a SEAL, so you can be pretty sure that most of those scenes actually happened at some point. (There's a scene involving a karambit in The Terminal List that he has talked about on a few podcasts; gruesome as it was, it was a technique actually used by the Shining Path guerillas.)

James Hornfischer's WWII naval history books are outstanding. Last Stand Of the Tin Can Sailors, about the Battle Off Samar, is an amazing story that's exceptionally well told. Neptune's Inferno covers the naval battles of Guadalcanal, and The Fleet At Flood Tide generally follows Admiral Raymond Spruance through the war. (He has a fourth book, Ship Of Ghosts, about the USS Houston, that I haven't read.)

The irony of Last Stand and Inferno is that Last Stand will leave you understanding how we won WWII, and Inferno will leave you wondering how we won. Last Stand is about men taking the reins and charging into battle with no realistic hope of survival, yet somehow pulling off the unthinkable and turning back a vastly superior force, whereas Inferno is the epitome of the USN saying, "never let progress stand in the way of tradition."

Andy Weir's The Martian and Project Hail Mary are both excellent reads. I would recommend listening to the Audible version of Project Hail Mary, as there are some things in it that are better heard than read. (Weir's second novel, Artemis, is OK, but not nearly as good as the first and third.) All three novels are stand-alone stories, so you can read them in any order you choose. I would recommend not reading about or listening to anything involving Project Hail Mary before reading it, though, as it's very difficult to say anything about it without spoiling something. I wouldn't even read the publisher's blurb about it if you order it online.

Jack Campbell's Lost Fleet series is really good if you like "naval battles in space" sorts of sci-fi. The hero of the story is a man whose last action in battle (a headlong, hopeless charge at the enemy) prevented the destruction of his side's fleet, but he was thought lost. At the opening of the first novel, it's a century later, and his stasis pod has just been found by a massive fleet on its way to a sneak attack on the enemy.

The sneak attack turns out to be a trap, and all of the officers of flag rank are killed, leaving the hero (a Commander when he was lost, "posthumously" promoted to Captain) as the senior officer in the fleet due to his time in grade. After a century of warfare, he is also the only officer left on either side who understands strategy; essentially, the primary tactic of both fleets is the headlong charge (ironically taken from the hero's last-ditch effort), which results in high losses among the younger, bolder officers, so they lose and never get to rebuild the tactical or strategic experience.

The Lost Fleet novels can each stand on their own, but it is better to read them in order, as there is a through-line in the over-arching story of the attempt to get the Lost Fleet home.

The Lost Fleet is a great series. The physics of space and distance are done well.
 
Top Bottom