Neighbor's Dog Attacked One of My Goats

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tynyphil

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I've been raising pygmy/nigerian dwarf goats for 30 years now. When asked I always recommend GOOD fences. Not so much to keep the goats in but to keep your neighbor's dog OUT. That's the most likely threat to your animals. I have neighbors that I have very good relations with but they WILL NOT keep their animals on their own property. Hence, my fences....backed up with a hotwire. I lost 2 goats to coyotes a few years ago.....that's when I added a guard dog living with the goats.......no problems now.
 

magna19

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I've been raising pygmy/nigerian dwarf goats for 30 years now. When asked I always recommend GOOD fences. Not so much to keep the goats in but to keep your neighbor's dog OUT. That's the most likely threat to your animals. I have neighbors that I have very good relations with but they WILL NOT keep their animals on their own property. Hence, my fences....backed up with a hotwire. I lost 2 goats to coyotes a few years ago.....that's when I added a guard dog living with the goats.......no problems now.
Thats exactly what my buddy did that raised goats. Gone during the day at regular job. Lived out in the boonies. Anatolian Shepherd Problem solved
 

turkeyrun

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Hope all works out with the Vet. Sounds like she took a beating and just sore, thankfully.

Appears the neighbor will take care of the Vet bill. In case of the worst, add replacement cost. (I didn't see that mentioned in earlier posts.)

Rehoming only puts the problem on somebody else. You didn't shoot the dog, but chances are someone somewhere will.
 

Timmy59

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No, the problem isn't solved. That would just create other problems that have to be solved. Like finding a dog, paying for a dog, training the dog, maintaining the dog, etc.

I don't want a donkey and I don't want a dog like that. Another dog, especially a big dog, is a substantial expense. So is a donkey...and both options create additional problems. Those solutions MAY prevent a similar situation in the future...they won't guarantee it won't happen. Not to mention it doesn't solve the biggest problem which is the injured goat.

The best solution would be for people to take care of the damn dogs they have. Aside from that, the best solution in this case is my goat recovers and the neighbor steps up to compensate me (although that's the least of my concerns) and to make sure this doesn't happen again and we move on with life as good neighbors to one another.

Things don't generally occur in a vacuum. Actions, and reactions, have consequences.
Do not trust a donkey, search donkey attacks and you'll see yourself. After several critter loses, which is time, money and heartache dogs not belonging to us don't fare well.
 

tynyphil

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Long, but I found this interesting.

As I mentioned I lost 2 goats to what I finally learned was to coyotes. What I found on 2 separate occasions was a dead goat on it's side with the belly hollowed out. There were no other visible wounds anywhere on the goat. My mistake was thinking that when the goats went in the barn in the evening that they stayed there all night.
Put up a game camera to learn they would go back and forth off and on all night grazing. Saw a coyote on the camera so I went the Anatolian Sheperd route. Got a puppy and put him in with the goats. On the 3rd occasion the puppy was barking in a panic one night and I got up and went to the goats. There was a goat lying on it's side in much the same area as the other 2. It was not dead but foaming at the mouth. It's throat was wet. Got her upright and calmed, she recovered after a few minutes. So....the coyotes were laying in wait and then would catch the goat by the throat, suffocating it without breaking the skin then eating the organs to their hearts content. The puppy finally grew up and would not tolerate anything out of the ordinary and would accompany the goats most anywhere. He loved people as long as you were approved by me. I have them on only about 2 acres and the goats were being killed within 50 yards of the barn

gabe_job.jpg
 

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