Home Ownership, done right

HoLeChit

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I’ll one up you on those silly steel roofs. Slate, while expensive, is a much better option. There’s 200+ year old slate roofs. Copper gutters are in the same category. 50-100+ years of serviceable life.

Like @Catt57 said, old growth lumber for framing is far superior.

I feel that a single story home built into a hillside would be ideal, with only half of the home exposed to the elements.
 

Letfreedomring

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I’ll one up you on those silly steel roofs. Slate, while expensive, is a much better option. There’s 200+ year old slate roofs. Copper gutters are in the same category. 50-100+ years of serviceable life.

Like @Catt57 said, old growth lumber for framing is far superior.

I feel that a single story home built into a hillside would be ideal, with only half of the home exposed to the elements.
That's what I was thinking too. Facing west and a lake, but I would have it bi-level with garages/shop below living quarters and balcony. Have lots of solar tubes and 65" longitudinal monitors in all the interior rooms for "windows" so you can chose whatever weather you want. If the pResident can have a fake Whitehouse lawn then dammit, so can I! Lol. Here I thought I was the only hermit or is it hobbit?🤭
 

Profreedomokie

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I would have to have some kind of back electrical power back up. A generator, windmill, or solar for my heating and air system. There is a worldwide push by these "Go Green " governments to control your thermostat. I think it was in Spain they were telling businesses that 80 degrees was the lowest they could run their AC. You know it will come here eventually. Governments want to control every aspect of your life.
 

Aku

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I've always liked the idea of a half above/half below ground house, manufactured plastic wood framing, metal roof, geothermal heating and cooling technology, next to running water for electricity. I would also add, an air conditioned, noise suppressed, basement gun range. 10' rock wall, and moat, all around the property. Treehouse guard tower, with an EMP emitter.
 

Bocephus123

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If I build a house, which isn't likely, it'll be ICF.
Insulated Concrete Forms.

With gun ports. I'm tired of the crows and feral cats getting away whilst I open a door and jockey for position.
All concrete 12" exterior walls concrete panel roof.Full Basement... . wave at tornado's as they go by.
 

ICanFixIt

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I would have NO central heat and air. Everything would be done with multiple split system heat pumps. If one system had a problem, the other systems would mitigate the impact until you repaired the problem unit. I installed one in my garage last year and it is now the most comfortable "room" in the house.
 

Timmy59

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So the moans and groans of home ownership thread, [LINK HERE], got me wondering.....

It'd be interesting to hear all the ideas of how to build a better house. FUNCTIONAL STUFF.
I'm not talking the cosmetic stuff like granite countertops or the fancy light fixtures.
It's necessary for the ladies - but is secondary for this discussion.

If you were in charge to build yourself a house, with the intent of *NO/LITTLE* maintenance - and built to be easily *REPAIRABLE*.
Sure, ICF concrete houses sounds cool, and is tough as nails - but you can't move walls, easily expand the house, or repair it - if needed.
What would you use or how would you plan/design it?


I'll start:
1) Absolutely must have a standing-seam metal roof with No exposed fasteners, a true 50 yr roof. DO NOT use the agricultural metal roofs with exposed fasteners (the fasteners start coming loose after 10-15 years and start leaking). If I recall correctly, I think standing seam is only about 20% more.

2) Heating and Cooling your house is a long-term expense, and I hate spending $200/month when it's not necessary.
I'd sacrifice a little interior square footage, and seriously OVERKILL the insulation R-value. Walls R-50, attic R1million, double/triple thermal breaks in the slab to minimize heat loss.
As for insulation type - I'd go back and forth between closed-cell foam insulation and boring fiberglass insulation. Closed-cell foam insulation (really good, seals air leaks, the closed-cell doesn't absorb water - but is very expensive and PERMANENTLY INSTALLED), The simpler boring fiberglass insulation can be built up extra thick for really high R-value, and it's still easily removable/replaceable - if needed.

3) As for plumbing - If you must run plumbing through the slab - all pipes must be sleeved for easy replacement.
And for me - PEX is the only pipe: flexible, durable, and freeze-resistant (won't break).
When designing the plumbing pipe runs, No pipe fittings hidden inside the walls. The only pipe fittings would be located under the cabinet for easier fitting replacement, if needed. The pipe runs must be continuous run from one location to the next. Then the pipe run continues to the next location. (a sequential run, not a parallel run) If you're smart, plan the pipe run(s) so the last pipe run is near the water closet (like a big circle). This would be good for installing a continuous hot-water circulation pump, - or during the winter you only have to drip the LAST faucet on the pipe circuit to protect all the faucets.
If possible, minimize running any plumbing along exterior walls (reduced freeze risks).

4) NO brick exterior. ...At least for in central Oklahoma, where it's only a matter of time before the house shifts and exterior cracks open up.


I have other ideas, but this is a good start....
What would you do?


Disclaimer: My house belongs in the other thread. : )
🤣🤣, our home was built in 1930. It doesn't fit most of that criteria. But we own it and I do zero moaning or groaning about it. If I moan about anything its paying rent/ tax to Gov each year along with personal tax because we own a tractor (sore spot) I'm the guy who runs the standing seam machine. I suspect I along with my helpers run the greatest percentage of standing seam roofs in the state . I also slit the material for Levi who also own a machine and runs standing seam, also known as snap lock . Even with that being I put a duraloc panel with fasteners on our roof. But why Timmy59? 🤣 Because I and I alone installed our roof. A standing seam roof is better, but costs more, is more labor intensive due to coverage of the panel. I will be siding the house with standing seam as I've been collecting panels for quite some time. The raised beds are standing seam, the chicken coops to. If your post here sells SS roofs look forward to meeting either Levi or Timmy. I'm itching for retirement so they better get on it should they want to see my smiling face. 🤣🤣🤣.
 

Timmy59

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Some of y'all are talking about earth contact homes which are widely seen in Missouri. What happens when the earth shifts or shrinks like during dry times, If I was to build it would be metal frame, metal skinned and heavy insulated. Ranch style few to no steps for the days I have little pep.
 

turkeyrun

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I have thought about this, many a night. Drawn out plans and thought of changes.

My plan is to have a metal building, something along the lines of 40' x 80'x 12', looking like a 3 car garage and shop. Inside would heavy, closed cell foam insulation. Once completed, the house would be constructed inside the shop.
The house is 40' x 40' x 8', fiberglass insulated walls. Water and electrical will be low in the walls.

2 cellars will be dug, 12' x 12' each, garage slab poured on top. 1 will be a cellar. The other, with vault door, gun / reloading room.
 

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